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Showing class notes submitted in the last month by graduates in the 1990s

1994

GRD Law '94
Lopez, Juan

Local attorney Juan Lopez J.D. '94 was named as one of nine recipients of the 2016 California Peace Award for the 30th Assembly District. 

Lopez, a Morgan Hill resident who was born in Arizona and raised in Los Angeles, founded We the People in 2014, an organization that defends the civil rights of Morgan Hill residents and promotes multicultural events in the community.

“It is my honor to recognize these truly remarkable individuals and organizations who have made it their mission to promote peace throughout all of our communities,” Assemblymember Luis Alejo (D-Salinas) said. “The commitment and dedication they have demonstrated for their communities exemplify what this award is all about. It’s everyday heroes like these who help keep our neighborhoods safe.”

Lopez, who owns a bachelor’s degree in Chicano Studies from U.C. Berkeley and a law degree from Santa Clara University, served as director of the Latino Student Rights Project from 1994-95 and also worked at the Family Violence Law Center, the first male attorney hired there. He has worked in the Santa Clara County Public Defender’s Office since 1996, defending indigent clients. Lopez has been a board member of the Community Agency for Resources and Services since 2015.

He is joined as one of two Santa Clara County honorees by Gilroy native Sally Duran Armendariz, a statewide president of the Young Christian Workers and founding board member of the La Isla Pacifica Shelter for women and children.

submitted Aug. 1, 2016 11:50A

1998

'98
Garni, Alisa

Dr. Alisa Garni '98 has been part of the faculty at Kansas State University since 2008. Her substantive interests include international development, migration, and social change. In her published work, Dr. Garni has examined how changing local conditions in war-torn Guatemala, El Salvador, and Nicaragua affect people’s decisions to migrate to the United States. She has also examined how land tenure patterns affect local development strategies across high migration communities. Pursuing questions on gender, migration, and development, Dr. Garni has also conducted ethnographic research on independent women entrepreneurs who carry goods between El Salvador and the United States. Studying how they do so sheds light on local mechanisms for combating gender inequality and promoting development. In collaborative work, Drs. Garni and Weyher connect questions of migration and development to changing conditions in war-torn El Salvador. They argue that on-going mass migration—driven by new conditions of desperation and alienation—represents a critical dissipation of class relations and struggle. Building on research examining the relationship between neoliberalism and high crime rates in war-torn Central America, they also examine how neoliberalism’s structural and ideological components both reflect and further contribute to the conditions and growing sense of estrangement that many Salvadorans face.

Dr. Garni’s work has been published/is forthcoming in Latin American Research ReviewSociological PerspectivesSociological ForumLatin American Perspectives, and Journal of Immigrant and Refugee Studies. She has presented her research at conferences in Athens, Santiago, and across the United States. Currently, Dr. Garni is conducting research on the relationship between Mexican/Central American immigration, changing land use patterns, and local, state, and national immigration policy. Dr. Garni has taught courses on international development (graduate and undergraduate), qualitative methods (graduate), racial and ethnic relations, and introductory sociology.
submitted Jul. 24, 2016 2:27P

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