Share your latest news with fellow Broncos.

Class Notes | Obituaries

Submit a Class Note or Obituary »

Showing obituaries submitted in the last month

Alan A. Parker

By anyone’s standards, Alan A. Parker J.D. '64 enjoyed a lofty legal career.  After a successful law practice in San Jose, he worked for U.S. Rep. Don Edwards and became the general counsel for the U.S. House Judiciary Committee, playing a central role in the impeachment effort against Richard Nixon. In the waning days of the Jimmy Carter administration, he served as an assistant attorney general.

All of that was remarkable enough. It was more noteworthy because of an unusual gap in his resume. Parker did not attend college. In fact, he nearly failed to get a high school degree.

He did graduate from Santa Clara University Law School in 1964 and passed the bar exam shortly afterward. Nobody ever questioned that he had a head for strategy and a gift of gab, recounting stories and offering advice in a resonant radio narrator’s voice.

Parker died on Sept. 2 at the age of 88 in the Sacramento-area town Lincoln after a long illness. He left behind a legacy in California Democratic politics and an eclectic career that was guided in part by his friendships with Edwards and Senator Alan Cranston.

Born in New York City on Nov. 28, 1927, Parker moved with his parents to Southern California while he was still young. His father, William Parker, was a Hollywood writer and his mother, Beverly, ran the women’s department in a large store. Both parents were Russian immigrants.

A fitful but bright high school student who preferred to read at the library rather than attend class, Parker served in the U.S. Army from 1946 to 1947, entertaining troops as a disc jockey in the South Pacific. Disappointed in his ambitions for a radio career, he worked for a decade as a safety engineer and manager, jobs that took him to the Bay Area.

His passion, however, was politics. Along with Cranston, Parker was instrumental in forming the California Democratic Council, a network of Democratic clubs that became the organizational backbone of the party. In 1960, he was part of a movement to draft Adlai Stevenson for a third run at the presidency.

After Cranston was elected controller in 1958, Parker took a state  job as a inheritance tax appraiser, a job that  brought him into frequent contact with lawyers. His widow, Odette Parker, said Parker went to law school after being urged to do so by then-attorney and later Santa Clara County Superior Court Judge Bill Harris. “He said, ‘Alan, you’re so bright, why don’t you go to law school?‘’’ Odette Parker said.

Taking advantage of a policy that allowed credit for life experience, Parker studied for a year at San Francisco College of Law and then completed a full three-year legal course at Santa Clara. He formed a legal partnership in San Jose with John Chargin, another lawyer active in politics.

In 1971, Parker was recruited by Edwards to become his legislative director. Two years later, he was appointed general counsel for the House Judiciary Committee. After brief service as an assistant AG under Attorney General Griffin Bell, he returned as general counsel in 1980, when Jimmy Carter was defeated by Ronald Reagan.

Parker helped to draft the articles of impeachment against Nixon that were approved by the Judiciary Committee in 1974 (Nixon resigned before the full House could vote on them.)  The former San Jose lawyer also participated in an expansion of the Voting Rights Act, the defeat of a proposed constitutional amendment to outlaw abortion, and the investigation into the Kent State shootings.

“Alan never lost his fidelity to truth and the Constitution, and he never lost his marvelous sense of humor and dedication to his family,’’ said U.S. Rep. Zoe Lofgren, who succeeded Edwards in 1995.

Parker is survived by his wife of 45 years, Odette, and his four children by a previous marriage — Billie, Jonathan, Betsy and Barbara.
submitted Sep. 20, 2016 11:38A


UGRD Engineering '53
Frank Brandon Maus Jr.

Frank Brandon Maus, Jr. '53, known to firneds as "Brandon", passed away on March 8, the day before his 86th birthday. 

Born in Petaluma, California, to Frank and Helen Maus, Brandon attended Santa Clara University and graduated with a degree in Mechanical Engineering. 

Upon graduation, Brandon served in the United States Army where he worked in the White Sands Proviing Groudn testing Nike missiles and atomic warheads. After his service, Brandon pursued a second degree in Electrical Engineering. 

In 1956, he began a long and storied career with United Airlines where he led engineering teams that work on or helped design countless iconic passenger airplanes, rising to the role of Chief Engineer for United at the The Boeing Company. Brandon went on to assist Lockheed in producing the initial Boeing space shuttle carrier and served as lead engineer and technical consultant for the NASA Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). He received a number of accolades and awards for his work, and was known as an industry expert having published many reports and manuals. As a testament to his efforts on the Boeing 777, one of the first of those planes off the production line was dubbed the "F. Brandon Maus". 

Brandon enjoyed many hobbies and pursuits, including extensive travels around the world with his wife Patricia. He was an avid model builder, active gardener, talented home chef, and dear friend to countless people.

Brandon will be lovingly remembered by his wife of 59 years, Partricia (nee Stockholm), sons Stephen (Debra) and Stuart (Helena), and beloved grandchildren, Andrew and Katherine. His cousin Catherine A. Johnstone '76 also graduated from Santa Clara. 

Brandon was predeceased by his brother, Walter.

submitted Sep. 21, 2016 1:48P


Donald Clendenning

Donald Clendenning M.S., '66  passed away on August 9, 2016, in Lake Oswego, Oregon. Donald Campbell Clendenning began his life on April 20, 1931 in Gananoque Ontario. During his one year battle with Cancer he approached each day with the same inner strength that had guided his life full of hope and confidence that bright days were ahead. Don had a very fulfilling life and will be greatly missed by all who were touched by his love. Don was preceded in death by his three older brothers: Kenneth, Leonard, and Gerald. He is survived by his wife of 62 years Carolyn King Clendenning, formerly of Orillia and Cochrane Ontario. His is also survived by his three children: Doug Clendenning (Janet) Atherton California, Patty Nelson (Jim) Phoenix Arizona, and Donna Kasabian (Ron) Lake Oswego Oregon. In addition there are 7 seven grandchildren who he cherished time with: Kelly and Patrick Clendenning; Christian, Nicholas and Peter Nelson; and Andrew and Katie Kasabian. Don graduated from Queens University in Kingston Ontario with a BS in Engineering Physics in 1954 and a Master's Degree from University of Santa Clara in Electrical engineering in 1967. Don's brothers and his wife Carolyn also graduated from Queens University. Don and family came to Willow Glen in 1961 where they lived for 50 years while he built his career with Lockheed Missiles and Space. During the 32 years at Lockheed he designed flight control systems for missiles followed by greater responsibility around managing teams of engineers in the guidance and control division. He was affectionately known as a Rocket Scientist who directed the development of missile systems capable of detecting, intercepting and destroying incoming ballistic missiles out of the atmosphere. These projects had names like HOE, ERIS and Thad and took him to various places like the Kwajalein Islands to participate in missile launches. Don had many interests but foremost was his love of family. Family was the priority. Throughout the years he would be at his kids events whether baseball, softball, or dance and when needed he would coach and or volunteer in whatever way possible. Other major interests were camping, skiing, tennis (he played doubles into his early 80s) hiking, Hockey games (sharks), reading, bird watching and education. Once retired, they enjoyed trips to Hawaii and frequent cruises around the world. Don will be remembered for many things but love of family and the priority it was in his life will never be far from our hearts.


submitted Oct. 4, 2016 9:47A


Larry Henninger

 Larry Henninger, M.B.A. '64 died peacefully in the Skilled Nursing Facility at the Vi in Palo Alto on April 11, at age 83. He was born on Jan. 12, 1933, in Roseburg, Oregon. One of his biggest adventures as a teenager was attending the International Boy Scout Jamboree in France in 1945, an unusual opportunity to see Europe while it was still recovering from WWII. He graduated from Stanford in 1954 with a B.A. in economics. During his Stanford days he was president of Theta Xi fraternity and was a sponsor in the freshman dorm, Encina. It was in this role he met Amber '71, M.A. '80, who was a sponsor in the freshman women's dorm, Roble. They married in 1954 in Menlo Park.

He was in Air Force ROTC and left immediately after graduation to report to Texas. After his initial training, he was sent to Lakenheath/Mildenhall in England where Amber joined him in 1955 after her graduation. They used this time abroad to travel whenever possible, seeing much of Europe before it was a common destination. After coming back to the States in 1956, they returned to Palo Alto and Larry began his career in 1956, in what was then called Personnel, at Litton Industries. His next employer was Philco and he worked in finance there during its transition to Philco/Ford. After that, he was the business person in the team Peter McCuen put together to start Acurex -- Larry and 17 engineers. He continued in this role in Barron Data Systems in San Leandro until the 1980s when he went into his own business as a consultant for small businesses. These clients presented very special opportunities for him to use his skills in helping people define the role they and their companies should play in the fast emerging electronics industry.

Larry was in one of the first classes in the part-time night MBA program at Santa Clara University. Though he felt he was not an academic, he enjoyed the program for its mix of students who often were more versed in the application of the material while the professors knew the theory. Convinced of the value of the program, he served on the Business School Advisory Board for several years. He also started at Santa Clara the CEO Forum, a group of small company CEOs who met monthly to share their issues in the role of CEO, an opportunity available only when there is personal trust built within the group. What Larry liked most was helping people find how they might be all that they could be. Whether that was with clients, friends or family -- whether in long conversations over dinner, in formal meetings or phone calls in time of difficulties -- Larry was there to listen.

In the consulting role Larry had the opportunity to spend four years as liaison with the Chambre du Commerce de Haute Normandie, in Rouen, France, trying to find ways to facilitate relationships between Rouen and Silicon Valley. In the early 1990s, through USAID, he participated in a project to try to share his enthusiasm for entrepreneurship in Russia as they began to transition from Communism. With the lack of understanding for the basic personal attitudes to enable the transition, after 40 years of Communism, his skills were well utilized in companies with less than 200 people. It was a great disappointment to see how the current Russia has been reverting to its old lifestyle. Nevertheless, he has retained lasting friendships with his Russian contacts.

In the community, Larry was a member of Rotary and very active in what was then the Stanford Area Council Boy Scouts. He was on the Executive Committee as well as in leadership roles in the troops to which his sons belonged. He received the Silver Beaver Award from the Council. He also led several council troops to National Jamborees on the East Coast.He was a devoted follower, win or lose, of Stanford football and men's basketball. He believed Stanford athletes were unique in their focus -- focus necessary to try to mesh academic, athletic and personal lives. Involvement with Hoover Institution also was most rewarding, particularly with the National Security Affairs Fellows Program and the annual classes of military and State Department personnel with whom he thoroughly enjoyed the opportunity to interact.

He was very proud of his sons, Dwight and Derek, truly pleased that they had grown, each in their own ways, to be contributing members of society as he had hoped. Larry and Amber had 61 years of shared opportunities and pleasures. In the '80s and '90s, they spent considerable time at Incline Village at Tahoe, enjoying the mountains and their friends there. In recent times Larry's health had made that less possible.

submitted Oct. 4, 2016 12:47P


Lawrence Wisne

Lawrence Wisne '70, 68, passed away peacefully in Florida Hospital on Monday, September 19, 2016 in Orlando, Florida at the age of 68. Larry is survived by his wife, Christine; children, Lawrence Jr. (Allison), Michael and Anna; grandchildren, Locke, Reece, and Hudson; his brothers, Alan (Kathy) and Joseph (Debbie); nieces, Shannon and Madelyn and nephew, Lee. He is preceded in death by parents, Anthony and Hazel; sisters, Janis and Toni; niece, Kyla and nephew AJ.

Larry was born on December 17, 1947 in Detroit, Michigan to Anthony and Hazel. He graduated from University of Detroit Jesuit High School in 1966, earned his bachelor's degree from Santa Clara University in 1970 and his master's degree from University of Denver in 1972. He married Judy Wisne (Piotrowski) in 1977. They have three children, Lawrence Jr., Michael and Anna. He later re-married Christine Wisne (Hughes) in 2005; her daughter is Angelica Hughes. Larry's daughter-in-law is Allison Wisne M.A. '08.

Larry had an illustrious professional career, taking over as President of Progressive Tool and Die (PICO) in 1979. He built the business that started in his father's garage into an international powerhouse, culminating with multiple appearances on Forbes' list of 500 largest private companies in America in the late nineties and sale of the business to Fiat S.p.A in 1999. Additionally, he became one of the premier restaurateurs in the Midwest, advancing fine dining in the Detroit area by starting Tribute Restaurant, which garnered national attention for its innovate approach to cuisine and top-flight clientele. Larry had a deep love for athletics including racquetball, hockey and softball, but none more than golf and his Detroit Lions.

He was a kind and giving man who had many passions including photography, nature and cooking. He was wholeheartedly dedicated to his faith in the Catholic Church and was always generous to those who were less fortunate. 


submitted Oct. 4, 2016 12:57P

Search all notes/obituaries: