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Showing obituaries submitted in last 6 months

Faculty & Staff

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David Palmer
On September 18, David R. Palmer, retired faculty member from the Management Department, died after a chronic illness. He was a treasured member of the SCU faculty for more than 30 years.  With his family and friends, we remember David and offer our prayers for his eternal rest and the consolation of all his loved ones.

David taught courses in both the undergraduate and MBA programs in the Leavey School of Business, specializing in management strategy and corporate social responsibility.  He also was instrumental in developing the Leavey School’s theme-based Executive MBA program in which he taught for many years.  David had a special love for Santa Clara University and a warm fondness for those with whom he worked for so many years.

While we mourn David’s death we also recall the gift he was to his family, friends, colleagues and students. Notes of condolence may be sent to his companion of many years, Marcie Radius, care of the Management Department:
Ms. Marcie Radius
c/o Management Department
Leavey School of Business
Santa Clara University
500 El Camino Real
Santa Clara, CA 95053
 

 

submitted Nov. 9, 2015 12:07P

Friends of the University

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Paula Z. Kirkeby

On Friday, April 1, the de Saisset Museum lost a dear friend. Paula Z. Kirkeby was the owner of Smith Andersen Editions and a relentless advocate for artists, all the way up to her last day. Three decades ago our relationship began when she entrusted the de Saisset Museum with the Smith Andersen Editions Archive representing some of the most important California artists of our time. She facilitated many other gifts to our institution and we are forever grateful. But more importantly, we will miss her laughs, her unique perspectives, her storytelling moments, and the precious times we spent together. We will miss her, but somehow right now it is comforting to know she left her mark on our institution.

Paula was born in Lynn, Massachusetts; she grew up in Dorchester, Massachusetts, and fondly remembered being surrounded by artists and culture in her youth. Paula moved to Palo Alto, California, after marrying Stuart Kaplan in 1955. In October 1969, Paula and her second husband, Phillip Kirkeby, opened Smith-Andersen Gallery.
 
Smith-Andersen Gallery was to be Paula's lifework. Soon after opening, it became a hub of cultural activity and rapidly put Palo Alto in the "art scene." The gallery represented nationally and internationally known artists including Sam Francis, Bruce Conner and Ed Moses; it also worked with Nathan Oliveira, Frank Lobdell and Keith Boyle, who were on the Stanford faculty. Right up into 2016, many outstanding artists were supported by the gallery and benefited from Paula's generosity. Paula believed artists should be given support while they were living, and she lived this belief.
 
Smith-Andersen Gallery expanded to include the production of aquatint and monotype print-making and invited artists to work in-residence to produce works of fine art. These works have found homes, and are loved, the world over. Paula was a staunch advocate for monotype printing as a fine art at a time before it was in favor. Close relationships were forged with major Bay Area institutions including the de Saisset Museum at Santa Clara University, Stanford University and the Achenbach Foundation. Paula was much loved and respected by a great number of people from many walks of life, and she will be remembered in part by the lasting legacy she left through charitable donations, time she spent with people who purchased their first works of art, and her passion and inspiration that she freely shared with artists. The art community has lost a creative and caring patron and the void will be difficult to fill.
 
Paula continued to run Smith-Anderson Gallery after her husband Phillip passed away in October 2011; she operated the gallery and print studio and hosted exhibitions. Her energy and passion seemed endless. As the 2016 spring equinox approached, Paula fell ill and was cared for by her sons and daughters-in-law, yet she still managed Smith-Andersen from her bedside until her family, their hands in hers, bid her farewell.
 
Paula is survived by her three sons and six grandchildren. 

 

submitted Apr. 5, 2016 1:57P
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Beverly Honzel

Beverly Jane Honzel passed away Oct. 6, 2015, in her Lake Oswego home. Bev was born June 21, 1930, as the only child to Leona (Robertson) and Thomas Brown Young in Klamath Falls. After graduating from Klamath Union High School in 1949, she attended San Jose State College. Beverly married Andrew Honzel Jr. '53 in 1953, and they made an extraordinary team. Soon they were joined by sons, Mark '76 and Drew '78, followed by daughter, Karen. Bev was a selfless and devoted wife and mother. She was an exceptional cook and hostess, and delighted in friends becoming extended family. She created a home that welcomed all who entered. Bev was in every sense of the word a true gentlewoman. She was a trusted and loving partner to her husband of 61 years, Andy. Bev was a kind and loyal friend, always thoughtful and generous. Beverly was preceded in death by her son, Mark, and is survived by her beloved husband, Andy of Lake Oswego; son, Drew (Betsy) of Klamath Falls; daughter, Karen Musica (Mike) of Tacoma; grandchildren, Tyler Honzel (Nicole), Jack Honzel, Dana Angelos '10 (Greg), Hannah, Tory and Ellie Honzel, and Ali and Eric Musica; and two great-grandchildren.

submitted Nov. 9, 2015 1:55P

Unknown

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Marty Pasetta

Marty Pasetta '54, a veteran director of live TV extravaganzas, including 17 Academy Awards shows and inaugural galas for Presidents Carter and Reagan, has died. He was 82.

Pasetta died May 21, 2015, from injuries sustained in a car accident in La Quinta, where he lived. During four decades in television, Pasetta directed and produced specials for many of Hollywood's biggest names, including Frank Sinatra and Bing Crosby, and oversaw star-studded tributes to Elizabeth Taylor, Fred Astaire and Alfred Hitchcock. He was credited with convincing Elvis Presley to suspend his drug use and lose weight for the 1973 special "Elvis: Aloha from Hawaii," which has been described as the first satellite broadcast of a live concert.

The Elvis special was Pasetta's proudest achievement, according to his son, Marty Pasetta Jr. According to some estimates, more than 1 billion people worldwide saw the concert.

The show he was best known for, however, was the Academy Awards. He directed every Oscars telecast from 1972 to 1988 and was responsible for introducing split screens, instant replays and musical numbers involving large numbers of background dancers, lasers and pyrotechnics.

His years with the Oscars show were also memorable for unscripted drama, on and off stage. In 1973, for example, tempers flared backstage when Sacheen Littlefeather accepted Marlon Brando's best actor award for "The Godfather" with an overtly political speech decrying the depiction of Native Americans in film. John Wayne was in the wings "and was so angry he wanted to go out and pull her off stage," Pasetta recalled in an interview with United Press International in 1984.

Then there was the time that presenter Charlton Heston's car blew a tire on the freeway. As a last-minute replacement for the actor known for playing Moses in the "The Ten Commandments" Pasetta yanked Clint Eastwood from his seat in the audience.

"That was the year the writers had got very clever," Pasetta recalled in the Chicago Tribune years later. "It was all written in Biblicalese — 'thou' this, 'thou' that — and poor Clint couldn't paraphrase it.... It totally freaked him out."

Pasetta also presided over the 1974 program disrupted by a naked man who "streaked" across the stage behind Elizabeth Taylor and David Niven. "We have been accused over the years of planning that one," Pasetta told the Chicago Tribune, "but it's not true."

The prank prompted a witty comeback from Niven, who said: "The man is showing off his shortcomings."

Martin Allen Pasetta was born June 16, 1932, in San Jose. He attended Santa Clara University, but dropped out to work at San Francisco's KGO-TV, where he rose to stage manager and producer. He later moved to Los Angeles, landing his first major directing job on "The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour" in 1967. He also helped launch and direct the long-running game shows "Wheel of Fortune" and "Love Connection."

In 1971, Fr. Schmidt asked Marty to take responsibility for securing the talent and staging the show at the Golden Circle Theatre Party, one of Silicon Valley’s most spectacular and successful fundraisers. Pasetta said, "Who could say no to Father Schmidt?" For the next 15 years, he flew in from Hollywood with entertainers, musicians, and a skeleton stage crew, all of whom donated their services to the University and made for an unforgettable legacy.

In addition to his son Marty, Pasetta is survived by his wife, Elise, daughter, Debbie Palacio '84, son Gregory and five grandchildren.

submitted Jan. 25, 2016 8:33A
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John Ball

Superior Court Judge John Thomas Ball J.D. '58 passed from this life Nov. 10, 2015, in Reno, Nevada, from recent health complications at the age of 82. Born in San Jose, California, John spent his early years residing in the Santa Cruz Mountains before moving to Los Gatos, where he graduated from high school. John went on to obtain his Bachelor's Degree from the University of California Berkeley before enrolling in the University of Santa Clara where he obtained his Law Degree.

After practicing law for twenty-eight years in San Jose, John was appointed as a Municipal Court Judge for the County of Santa Clara serving three years before being elevated to the Superior Court of Santa Clara where he presided mainly in criminal cases for some twenty years.

Following his retirement and a move to Plumas County in 2001, John became part of the Assigned Judges Program traveling throughout Northern California for the past fourteen years hearing mainly felony criminal cases mainly in Lassen County. For the past four years Judge Ball has sat on the bench at High Desert Correctional Center as an Assigned Judge. Throughout his career on the bench Judge Ball has presided over one hundred homicide trials of which fifteen defendants were charged with the death penalty.

John became a member of Rotary in 1971 and was an active member of the of the Portola Rotary since moving to the Sierra's. He enjoyed the outdoors through fishing and snowmobiling and will be remembered fondly by many for his quick wit and fun loving teasing. John is survived by his wife: Patsy Williams Ball of Portola, son; Stanton Ball of Santa Cruz, and grandsons; Colter and Josh. John is preceded in his passing by his daughter; Claudia. John will be greatly missed by many in his judicial life and especially by those in his personal life.

submitted Dec. 17, 2015 4:05P
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