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1941

'41
James H. Flippen

James “Jim” Hartwell Flippen Jr. ’41 was reputed for his innovative contributions to pediatric medicine as well as his incisive logic, wit, and wisdom, dapper bow ties, ever-calm demeanor, and active community involvement. He exemplified a life well planned and a life well lived. Born in Manhattan in 1920, Jim was the elder son of New York internist James H. Flippen Sr. M.D. Being from three generations of physicians, he knew he wanted to be a physician from an early age. He was a graduate of Santa Clara University and was at the top of his class in pre-med. Jim was the first Santa Clara graduate to be accepted into the top three medical schools: Stanford, Harvard, and Johns Hopkins. He is a graduate of the Stanford Medical School, class of 1945. While in medical school, Jim was a cadet in the Navy Reserve. Following medical school, he joined the Navy and was a WWII and Korean War veteran, deployed as the ship’s senior medical officer from San Francisco to Japan and Korea. In 1946, Jim married Beverly Walsh. They met when Beverly was a student at UC Berkeley and Jim was a Navy medical officer stationed in San Francisco/Tanforan. They immediately moved to Boston, where Jim held a fellowship in pediatric pathology at Harvard University. Upon their return to California, he served as chief resident at Stanford University. For 40 years, Jim was a pediatrician in private practice and clinical professor of pediatric cardiology at the Stanford Medical School. His experience dissecting the hearts of babies having died of congenital heart disease led to assisting surgeons in the field of open-heart surgery and teaching pediatric cardiology for 35 years. Jim formed a physician’s consortium and initiated construction of the Medical Plaza by Stanford Hospital. It was a novel concept of a single-floor medical office complex, occupied and owned by 40 independent physicians of all specialties. This proved to be a very lucrative investment for all concerned. Early in his esteemed career, Jim performed then state-of-the-art lifesaving total blood replacement transfusion through the umbilical vein of infants with acute hemolytic anemia due to blood type incompatibility with the mother. He performed hundreds of these and taught the procedure to pediatricians on the West Coast. In addition, he authored papers defining the genetic basis of two types of bone deformities as well as the physiologic basis of drowning while swimming after following hyperventilation, which he termed “silent drowning.” Through his medical contributions and leadership, Jim directly and indirectly saved innumerable lives and reduced injuries. During the 1960s and 1970s, he was appointed chairman of the California State Accident Prevention Committee of the Academy of Pediatrics, and he enlisted other pediatricians around the state to seek legislation requiring seat belts and infant car seats. Seat belts, smoke detectors, and harsh penalties for teenagers driving under the influence are now part of our everyday lives. Jim played a pivotal role in leading the way to these legislative mandates in California over 50 years ago, resulting in the saving of countless lives over the decades. When Jim retired, he and Beverly moved to White Oaks in Carmel Valley Village, where they lived for 20 years. The Flippens shared many travels and adventures to several continents and numerous countries. This included an African safari and a nearly yearlong stay in Europe, where they had a touring car and drove over 3,000 miles. The couple next resided at The Forum for a decade, where they continued to participate in activities and diverse cultural interests in the Bay Area—theater, ballet, concerts, and art exhibits. Jim also organized the first bocce ball competition at The Forum. Among his many talents, Jim designed three distinct homes, one of which reflected a Japanese design and garden. This home was featured in Sunset magazine. He was also a champion tennis player, who for decades competed in the American Medical Tennis Association and the World Medical Tennis Society doctors’ consortium (he played into his 90s). With his artistic abilities, Jim showcased his many original multimedia paintings at The Forum art shows. The subject matter included wife Beverly, still life, wildlife, landscapes and seascapes, and portraits and personalities. Over the years, Jim was an active member of his community and provided leadership and support to various organizations as chairman of the San Mateo County Heart Association, the pediatric sections of Sequoia and Stanford Hospitals, and the Professional Advisory Committee to the Peninsula Children’s Center (PEC) for severely emotionally disturbed children. He served as board president of the Chartwell School for Dyslexic Children in Monterey and the Monterey Bay Scottish Society, president of the Ladera Oaks Swim and Tennis Club, chairman of the Citizens Advisory Committee to the Transportation Agency of Monterey County, and the Roads Committee of the Carmel Valley Residents Association. Jim died peacefully at the exact time of the grand eclipse on Aug. 21 at The Forum at Rancho San Antonio in Los Altos. He was 97 years old. He was the devoted and loving father of son James Flippen III (Patty) ’70, daughter Kathleen Carmel ’69, grandchildren Travis Flippen and Jason Bradford (Kristin), and great-grandchildren Curtis and Davis Bradford. His extended family includes Alexis Flippen von Zimmer (David), Thomas Flippen II (Laurie), Jacqueline Sahud, Russel Flippen, Sandra Limon, Timothy Thomas Flippen, and former son-in-law Christopher Bradford. Jim was predeceased by his loving wife, Beverly, son Daniel Flippen, and brother Thomas A. Flippen. He also leaves behind his adopted miniature poodle, Jasper Vanderbilt Flippen. A transcript and video of Jim’s 2016 interview with the Stanford Historical Society’s Oral History Program can be found under his name or by the medical school faculty at https://purl.stanford.edu/yb644pt2832.

submitted Aug. 31, 2017 1:25P

1952

'52
Francis “Frank” Michael Heffernan Jr.

Francis “Frank” Michael Heffernan Jr. ’52 loved his friends, faith, and school, his SF Giants, Irish heritage, and cocktail hour—and most importantly and unconditionally, his family. Born in 1930 to Frank and Florence Heffernan, Frank was the youngest of five. Betty, Joan, Florence and Mary, his four sisters (whom he adored) preceded him in death. Born during the Depression and raised during World War II, Frank was fond of telling stories about San Francisco during that time. At 9 years old he was struck by polio, which became a defining moment in his life. Following a year in the hospital, he regained his ability to walk by swimming at the Olympic Club, which became a lifelong passion. (Earlier this year, the Olympic Club recognized Frank as one of its longest active members; he was also a former vice president of the club.) Frank grew up in the West Portal district of San Francisco, graduated from St. Cecilia’s grammar school and St. Ignatius High School, then followed in his father’s footsteps to Santa Clara University, where he swam and played water polo. Frank’s lifelong commitment and dedication to the school included coaching the water polo team in the 1950s—and more recently serving as a regent. Carrying on the family tradition, Frank’s children are also Santa Clara graduates. There was no prouder moment than when the fourth Francis Michael Heffernan ’16 graduated last year. After a brief stint at Stanford law school, Frank began his 50-year career in the insurance industry: first with SF-based Cosgrove/Marsh Mc Clennan before starting his own insurance company, Heffernan, Keiler and Doble, in 1963. In 1985, he sold his company to the Chicago-based Arthur J. Gallagher, ran its West Coast operation, and served on the board of directors before retiring in 2001. In 1952, he met Lenore Bertagna, who later became his wife, but it took another six years before they headed down the aisle at St. Vincent de Paul in 1958. Frank and Lenore moved to Greenbrae, California, in 1960, where they raised their family and became active members of the community. Frank’s lifelong devotion to the Catholic Church took on many roles: He was a parishioner at St. Cecilia’s in San Francisco and St. Sebastian’s and St. Anselm’s in Marin; a board member of the Dominican Sisters of Mission San Jose and deeply involved with their school, Immaculate Conception Academy, and their work with the Cristo Rey program; and finally as a Knight of Malta, where he proudly participated in the establishment of a free medical clinic in Oakland. Frank also served as president of the Serra Club and sat on finance committees of several dioceses and archdiocese in Northern California. One of his proudest roles with the Catholic Church was his involvement with St. Mary’s Cathedral, where he served as president of its first board of regents. In addition to spending time with family, attending Giants games, and entertaining friends at their Ross home and ranch in Calistoga, Frank and Lenore loved traveling the world, visiting over 100 countries and collecting art, friends, and memories along the way! Surrounded by his wife, children, grandchildren, and friends, Frank died in the comfort of his Ross home on Tuesday morning after a short illness. He was 86 years old. He is survived by his wife of 59 years, Lenore; his sons and their spouses, F. “Mike” Heffernan ’80 and Kristen, John, and Margie, and his daughter Ann Marie Heffernan ’84 and spouse Scott. Frank has nine loving grandchildren: Braeda, Michael, Olivia, Sofia, Boots, Isabella, Chase, Alexandra, and Samantha.

submitted Aug. 23, 2017 1:06P

1953

'53
Joe Ramona

A lifelong resident of San Jose, Joe Ramona ’53 was born on July 11, 1931, to Italian immigrant parents George and Marie Ramona. He was married to his high school sweetheart and love of his life, Joanne Dudley, for 65 years; she preceded him in death in 2016. Joe was a standout Bay Area football player at Lincoln High School and Santa Clara University, going on to play for the New York Giants, where he started his rookie year. After his year with the Giants, he served two years as an officer in the United States Army, and from there went on to be a successful businessman. Over the years he continued to be an avid Bay Area sports fan of the 49ers and San Francisco Giants. Joe loved the many years of Sunday family dinners and summer vacations at their mountain home on Donner Lake. He also had a green thumb, growing beautiful vegetable gardens every summer in his backyard. On Aug. 17, Joe died peacefully at home at the age of 86. His only sibling, Ralph Ramona, preceded him in death. Joe is survived by his four children, Gregg (Val), Jeff (Doreen), Dave Ramona ’82, Jodi (Michael); 10 grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. He will be forever missed.

submitted Aug. 31, 2017 1:33P

1962

'62
Roy Schoepf

Roy Francis Schoepf II ’62 devoted his life to God through his Catholic faith, his family, and his community. A retired U.S. Coast Guard commander, he died on Aug. 17, 2017, and is survived by his loving wife, Diane, four children, and eight grandchildren. He was an amazing man and will be greatly missed by all who were blessed to know him.

submitted Aug. 23, 2017 11:56A

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