In Shining Lights

Naima Fonrose ’20 felt like the queen of New York while she worked at the Tonight Show .

Magic. Naima Fonrose ’20 helped make it nightly in her summer internship. On her way to the office, she nearly pinched herself—an intern at the Tonight Show. Yeah, that Tonight Show starring Jimmy Fallon. Fonrose learned the ins and outs of the entertainment industry, as well as the shortcuts to Rockefeller Center from her apartment near the Upper East Side.

There’s research. There’s writing. There’s standing in for rehearsals. There’s barely any time to take a breath.

There’s a lot to do when you work at the Tonight Show, and as a production intern, Fonrose was into all of it.

“There are so many moving parts, but it’s a really fun, warm environment with dedicated people who work together to bring late-night comedy magic to your TV screen every night.”

Fonrose was just about five years older than some of her coworkers—her coworkers being the teenage cast of Stranger Things.

Naimafallon
The big time! Naima Fonrose ’20 spent the summer living a dream as an intern on the Tonight Show.

Fonrose helped make a video of the stars of the Netflix hit series and Fallon surprising some of their super fans at the wax museum Madame Tussauds New York. (See it below)

Add all of it up and it was a giddy rush: “So many things happened constantly, but I honestly just loved going to work every day because I never knew what would happen,” Fonrose says.

It was a growing experience.

“I have learned so much about entertainment, what it takes to be an excellent employee, and how being nice and working hard will get you so far in life,” she says.

And that’s how the magic’s made: with a strong work ethic and the resolve to put smiles on faces.

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