A rising star with personal touch

“It’s always better when an admissions staff regards you as a person, not an enrollment target,” opines one new college guide. Amen. “Unfortunately, such is not always the case.” Too true.

So where will you find these sage words? In the 2008 edition of Princeton Review’s The Best 366 Colleges, an 800-page paperback tome. More specifically, they’re in a write-up of SCU that commends the University because, it says, “Santa Clara University deserves recognition as a rising star that still manages to be highly personal and accessible.”

The guide also surmises that it “would be hard to find a place that is more receptive to minority students. There is a very significant minority presence here because Santa Clara works hard and earnestly to make everyone feel at home.” Which leads to the conclusion: “The university’s popularity is increasing across the board, which proves that nice guys sometimes finish first.”

In the realm of education, what students have to say counts for more than a little. The Best 366 also quotes from students who describe the academic workload at SCU as “excessive and insane” with professors who are, in the words of one junior, “brilliant, fascinating, humane people who have been nothing short of an inspiration to my friends and me.” Our favorite line, though, comes from praise heaped upon specific departments and programs: “The math department is too awesome for words.” —SBS

post-image Inspiring and accessible: a religious studies seminar with Associate Professor Paul Fitzgerald, S.J. Photo: Charles Barry
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