Bright Times

Sammi Bennett ’19 tap the potential of women in clean energy on her Fulbright scholarship to India.

Search for a trend in the interests of Sammi Bennett ’19 and you’ll find yourself at the intersection of women and economic development. A Fulbright scholarship allows the environmental studies and psychology double major to research women’s participation in clean-energy technology and entrepreneurship in Bangalore, India, this summer. “I am so thrilled to be able to explore my interest in women’s agency and decision-making in the clean-energy sector in India—a country that exemplifies the unrealized potential of women, with only 26 percent of women working in either the formal or informal economy,” Bennett says. Santa Clara helped her explore this territory. As a Global Social Benefit Fellow with SCU’s Miller Center for Social Entrepreneurship, Bennett helped Ugandan and Rwandan artisans—mostly women—expand into new markets and grow their production capabilities. She won’t be the only Bronco with a Fulbright award this year: James Wang ’19, Arelí Hernández ’19, and Katelyn (Katie) O’Neil ’19 (who completed her studies in December) are also traveling on Fulbright grants for teaching and research. In addition, Beau Scott ’19 earned a highly selective Coro Fellowship to explore a broad range of public sector policy issues for nine months in San Francisco.

post-image Sammi Bennett ’19, is an environmental studies and psychology double major and Fulbright scholarship recipient. She'll work on solar energy in India. / Image courtesy iStock
Teachers Becoming Students

Professors are trading in the chalkboard for a seat in a desk in a new teaching program at SCU.  

Build a Better Pipeline

Austin Gray ’19 takes initiative to increase the presence and confidence of black employees in the Silicon Valley.

 

Take Charge

For the first time ever, all six academic leadership roles are filled by women—not bad for a school that didn’t grant women degrees until 1961

Bringing Tradition Near

Kaweni Ibarra ’19 learned how to reinvigorate history when he apprenticed with a Hawaiian tattooist his senior year.