A Memory Machine

A dive bar that transcended its 2016 closure to reopen as a restaurant in mid- 2019. This Lazarus of Santa Clara locales is, of course, The Hut. For more than 70 years, there’s barely been a dull moment. Alumni from the 1980s and 2000s alike fondly recall tacking up their $1 bills or downing a few shots with their dads before commencement.

A Memory Machine
Once you saw this sign of a bucking bronco, you knew you were in for a good time. The dive bar has been so quintessential to Santa Clara history that it made an appearance on the cover of the 1990-91 yearbook.

IF I HAD A DOLLAR

Once upon a time, if you were to look up at the ceiling of The Hut for even just a second, your eye would be assaulted with thousands of marked-up $1 bills. That money wasn’t the bar’s profit—the bills were left by generations of graduating seniors.

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NOT A KID ANYMORE
The morning of commencement, before walking across that stage, graduates and their families stopped by The Hut to share a drink together in another cherished Santa Clara tradition dubbed “Dads and Grads.”

LOVE SHACK

The Hut has served as the catalyst for many Bronco love stories. In fact, it’s where Catie (Lawrence) Calcagno ’10 met her husband Michael Calcagno ’11, among many, many other couples.

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COMPLIMENTS TO THE CHEF

When Mary Battaglia ’06 was a senior, she bartended at The Hut. Back then, it seemed like there was a special every night, like Jager bomb Tuesdays. You won’t find that anymore, though. Daily specials at The Hut today are more likely to include smoked meats and locally sourced vegetables.

Teachers Becoming Students

Professors are trading in the chalkboard for a seat in a desk in a new teaching program at SCU.  

Build a Better Pipeline

Austin Gray ’19 takes initiative to increase the presence and confidence of black employees in the Silicon Valley.

 

Take Charge

For the first time ever, all six academic leadership roles are filled by women—not bad for a school that didn’t grant women degrees until 1961

Bringing Tradition Near

Kaweni Ibarra ’19 learned how to reinvigorate history when he apprenticed with a Hawaiian tattooist his senior year.