Matchy Matchy

A master’s in bioengineering, work at NASA Ames, study in El Salvador—they’re all part of the arc that Josergio Zaragoza ’13 has followed, thanks to the L.A. Catholic High School Scholarship Fund.

A master’s in bioengineering, work at NASA Ames, study in El Salvador—they’re all part of the arc that Josergio Zaragoza ’13 has followed, thanks to the L.A. Catholic High School Scholarship Fund.
While studying bioengineering, SoCal native Josergio Zaragoza ’13 has explored science through a microscope and connections across borders. He completed a senior design project studying mammalian receptor cells with a company in the East Bay. He traveled to El Salvador with an immersion program. He learned how to commercialize research through the Leavey School of Business California Program for Entrepreneurship. He played rugby, danced salsa, and worked with SCU’s biomaterials lab. Now he’s earning a master’s in bioengineering and assisting with research at the NASA Ames Bone and Signaling Lab, which studies the physiological effects of spaceflight. He came to Santa Clara thanks to the L.A. Catholic High School Scholarship Fund, which helps increase access to SCU among disadvantaged students from 21 Catholic high schools in the Archdiocese of Los Angeles. Last year, the Leavey Foundation, a longtime supporter of Catholic education, created a new grant program, The Leavey Match, to match two-for-one every gift to the scholarship fund. How cool is that?

post-image Bioengineering is his field. Salsa is his dance. View full image. Photo by Charles Barry.
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