Germ Fighter

Finding the source of outbreaks can prevent people from getting sick. One professor is making that search take less time.

The longer it takes to trace the source of illnesses, the greater the number of people at risk of becoming sick.

So David Hess, an associate professor and director of SCU’s biotechnology program, is reducing to 48 hours the time it takes to detect bacteria such as E. coli.

Using genome sequencing work done by Mark Pandori, director of the Alameda County Public Health Laboratory, software developed by Hess quickly identifies bacteria and—very soon—its antibiotic resistance.

This is the future of containing bacteria-related illness outbreaks, Hess says. “We are the first to really have this in place where we are actually reporting medical results—and not just for research.”

post-image Illustration by Andy Dearwater
First-Time Grads

Overcoming all odds due to the pandemic, the Class of ’24 finally get to experience the graduation that they have long been waiting for.

Drumroll, Please!

Santa Clara University’s renovated jazz studio gives music majors and non-majors more space to find their sound.

A Plan For Tomorrow

Santa Clara President Julie Sullivan unveils a new strategic plan, Impact 2030, with a focus on increasing access and opportunity, and, of course, SCU’s Jesuit values and Silicon Valley location.