Stopping Traffic

Having the Super Bowl in town raised awareness of the sexual slave trade—and the role SCU law faculty have played in fighting it.

Having the Super Bowl in town raised awareness of the sexual slave trade—and the role SCU law faculty have played in fighting it.
Does trafficking in child sex slavery increase when a city hosts a Super Bowl?

That’s the conventional wisdom, and it was the subject of anxiety again when the NFL’s championship game came to Santa Clara for the first time in February. But SCU’s legal experts on human trafficking point out that slave labor of many varieties is a year-round phenomenon in the Bay Area, “and the problem won’t go away when the Super Bowl is over.”

That’s what Lynette Parker and Ruth Silver Taube of the Alexander Community Law Center wrote in an op-ed published by the San Jose Mercury News a few weeks before the Super Bowl.

Last year the FBI’s San Francisco Field Office honored Parker for her work advocating for human trafficking victims. She helped establish the South Bay Coalition to End Human Trafficking, which has identified and assisted more than 300 victims since 2006.

post-image Photography by Joanne Lee
Helping the Helpers

Santa Clara students, faculty, partner with Ferry Foundation to create solutions that enrich quality of life for dementia, Alzheimer’s patients

No More Treading Water

The Santa Clara men’s water polo team is joining the West Coast Conference.

Go. Fight. Win.

Who cheers on the cheerleaders? The Santa Clara University Dance Team plays a vital role in the game day experience.

Here First

The work to open academia to Indigenous groups and voices continues with a series that adds modern lives to the archives.