Lawyering for the Homeless

Alexander Law Prize honoree Maria Foscarinis was moved to action by hearing of her family’s treatment during the German occupation of Greece.

Lawyering for the Homeless

This year’s Katharine and George Alexander Law Prize from the School of Law honors the primary architect of a federal law that permits public buildings to be used to assist homeless people.

Maria Foscarinis also founded the National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty and has been an advocate for homeless rights since 1985. “This work started for me when I was a child, hearing stories of how my family suffered during the German occupation of Greece,” she said. “It created a drive inside me to ensure no one should suffer homelessness or such extreme vulnerability.”

The Alexander Law Prize recognizes top legal advocates who have used their careers to help alleviate injustice and inequity.

Find out more about the award from the SCU School of Law. Plus, read what Foscarinis has to say about how the United States addressed homelessness last year in her op-ed piece from The Huffington Post.

Teaching Empathy, Growing Peace

Seeing war and studying for his Ph.D. taught Bill Stover that empathy can make peace possible. It’s something he spent the rest of his life teaching others. 

Growing Support

Jay MacIntosh ’86 kickstarted a nonprofit to help former foster kids make the transition to adulthood.

Stopping Stigma

Srisruthi Ramesh ’17 works in Southern India to eliminate stigma associated with important parts of a woman’s life. 

Collecting Success

Following stints as a scriptwriter on Happy Days to producing Hannah Montana, Barry O’Brien ’79 is tackling his biggest role yet as showrunner of The Bone Collector TV adaptation.