Tech benefiting humanity

Laureates helping developing nations are honored at the Seventh Annual Tech Museum Awards.

Inexpensive wind and solar-energy systems for rural Nicaragua. Simple-to-use medical diagnostic tests for infectious diseases—and equipment that can stand up to the heat and humidity in many developing countries. A low-cost artificial limb developed in India by an organization that has helped more than a million people already with its invention. These are just a few of the innovations by laureates honored at the Seventh Annual Tech Museum Awards in November.

Twenty-five organizations were honored, and five were presented with cash awards of $50,000. Laureates were selected by a panel led by the SCU Center for Science, Technology, and Society. The awards themselves were presented at a gala hosted at the San Jose McEnery Convention Center, with former 49ers quarterback Steve Young emceeing.

This year, Intel co-founder and philanthropist Gordon Moore was presented with the James C. Morgan Global Humanitarian Award. “Technology has helped create a lot of problems in the world,” Moore said, according to the San Jose Mercury News. “And I think it’s the one thing that will help solve them.” —SBS

post-image Solving problems we created: Gordon Moore hopes technology can do what politicians won't. Photo: Charlotte Fiorito Photography
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