Photography, lynching, and moral change

“Ethics at Noon” presents pressing questions about lynching and social change.

Photography, lynching, and moral change
Senior Michelle Dezember (left) and Emily Lewis '05 (right) help Assistant Professor Briget Cooks research the history of exhibitions of African-American art and culture.

The Markkula Center for Applied Ethics has been inviting the campus community to explore ethical issues at “Ethics at Noon” events for many years. Last January, Assistant Professor of Art History and Ethnic Studies Bridget Cooks gave a talk on “What Do We See When We Look: Photography, Lynching, and Moral Change.”
Cooks’ “Ethics at Noon” presentation and scholarly research discusses the existence and exhibition of photos depicting the lynching of African- Americans. She addressed some interesting questions, including:

• Who takes such horrifying pictures and why?

• Why would a museum or gallery want to display such disturbing images?

• Why would any of us want to view such pictures?

• Can the experience of seeing such pictures be redemptive?

Make It Better

The result of protests in support of historically marginalized groups on campus marks 20 years of improving lives.

Positively Bronco

Ciara Moezidis ’21 brainstormed how to celebrate and unite students from diverse backgrounds. #BroncoPosi was born.

Confronting the Past

Race does not have its roots in biological reality but in policies of discrimination

In Shining Lights

Naima Fonrose ’20 made television magic as an intern on the Tonight Show