Positively Bronco

Ciara Moezidis ’21 brainstormed how to celebrate and unite students from diverse backgrounds. #BroncoPosi was born.

Ciara Moezidis ’21 came up with the idea of #BroncoPosi magazine covers to “encourage love, promote positivity, and increase solidarity among student groups.” In them, students can see themselves, each other, and their values on alternative covers of national magazines. Students who volunteered to be featured on the covers share what they feel should be known about their identity. Those sentiments become headlines.

“Muslim Women Come in All Skin Colors & Outfits” reads one riff on a Glamour magazine cover. An issue of Out magazine declares, “Love is a terrible thing to hate.”

The covers pop up on screens and as posters throughout campus, as well as on social media. The campaign aims to open conversations between groups in support of radical inclusion, the idea that all are welcome in this mission of education and service, and that we should greet one another with open minds.

It is a reminder of how “students should strive towards education, not ignorance,” says Moezidis.

It is more than a well-intentioned art project. Soon after launching the poster campaign, the Associated Student Government worked with the Office for Multicultural Learning to host a Difficult Dialogue series, conversations with people from a variety of backgrounds delving into important political and controversial subjects, focusing on their impact on the community. Featured students also met weekly to discuss groups on the posters.

Glamour Final
The covers of Vogue, WIRED, and Men’s Health got a Bronco makeover.
Men's Health Final
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