She Admitted

A Q&A with Sandra Hayes, former dean of Undergraduate Admission.

Our retiring admissions director says there’s one thing prospective students don’t like admissions offices to do, and it’s something most students do every day. 

Sandra Hayes retired this summer after 15 years as dean of Undergraduate Admission—and 25 years of service to SCU. So she’s seen a few changes in how students apply to college. Here are a few insights from our recent conversation with her. Technology: “Core to what we do now. It was a very paper-driven process when I came into it.” The stealth phenomenon: “More and more often, the first time we hear from a student is through an application. They have already decided that they don’t want to be in constant contact with us or put themselves in a position where we’re constantly tapping them on the shoulder as they make their decision to apply.” Social media—it’s complicated: “A lot of colleges think text is the way to go—because that’s how students communicate. I have learned, in talking to students, that they don’t want every facet of their lives invaded by colleges and universities. It could be that ‘I don’t want you to text me. It’s fine that you send a letter, it’s fine that you send an email, but text is a space that I use for conversing with my friends, and I don’t want you in it.’” What hasn’t changed: “We’re still looking for those students who understand, or at least have an interest in, what we offer, which is excellent educational programs but always informed by giving back, informed by, ‘What will I do with this great education that I’m privileged to have access to?’” 

Read the full Q&A

post-image Applications for admission more than doubled during Sandra Hayes' tenure. Photo by Joanne Lee
A Return to Work

Jesuit values spark lobbying efforts for employee call-back programs

How to Be an Ethical Voter

Director of Government Ethics Program at SCU’s Markkula Center penned a guide on voting for ethical candidates.

What’s in A-Name?

A concert and a trademark: SCU explores what happens when race, performance, and trademark law intersect

Fear and Hope in a Pandemic

In an online survey, an SCU psychology professor found those who prepared most for the pandemic had the most fear, and the most hope.