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ART

A look at The Missing Peace: Artists Consider the Dalai Lama—now on campus

The task for 88 internationally renowned artists from 30 countries: Inspired by the Dalai Lama, work in media ancient and new to make your art. The result is The Missing Peace, with painting, sculpture, installation, and photography that are poignant and comical, contemplating religion and politics. Now, following a five-year world tour, 28 selections from the exhibit have taken up temporary residence on the third-floor Archives and Special Collections gallery of the Harrington Learning Commons, Sobrato Technology Center, and Orradre Library.

Among the artwork on display is an intimate portrait of the Dalai Lama by Chuck Close and one of Binh Danh’s signature chlorophyll prints, which replicates a photograph on a leaf using photosynthesis. Other artists featured include Richard Avedon, Squeak Carnwath, and Mike and Doug Starn.

The show runs through Dec. 14, with some special events this fall, including two panels with photographers and scholars: on Oct. 27, “Photography, Transformation, and Peace” (6–8:30 p.m., de Saisset Museum) and Nov. 8, “Art, Transformation, and Peace” (5–6:30 p.m., St. Clare Room, Learning Commons and Library). mag-bug

post-image His Holiness the Dalai Lama at Kamataka, India, January 1998. Copyright Richard Avedon, 1998. Courtesy of the Richard Avedon Foundation.
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