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Jerry McKevitt

Rev. Gerald L. McKevitt, professor emeritus of history at Santa Clara University, died September 18, 2015, at Sacred Heart Jesuit Center, in Los Gatos. He was 76 years of age.

Jerry was born in Longview, Washington, on July 3, 1939. His family relocated to Quincy (Plumas County) where he graduated from the local high school. He graduated from the University of San Francisco in 1961 with a history major and philosophy minor and began graduate studies in history at the University of Southern California, earning an MA. In 1963 he entered the Jesuit novitiate at Los Gatos to begin training for the priesthood. His studies took him to Gonzaga University, Spokane, and in 1967 he started doctoral studies in history at the University of California at Los Angeles, where he received his Ph.D. in 1972.  Theological studies were taken in Rome, where he received his degree in Sacred Theology from the Pontifical Gregorian University.

Jerry was ordained a priest in San Francisco in June 1975 and began a lifetime association with Santa Clara University. As research professor and archivist, he was given the task of writing the history of the university. Based on his doctoral dissertation, his The University of Santa Clara, a History, 1851-1977, was published by Stanford University Press in 1979.

Through the years Jerry rose to the rank of full professor serving as department chair, University archivist, University historian, and rector of the Jesuit Community.  In 2004 Jerry was named the Ignacio Ellacuria University Professor for Jesuit Studies at Santa Clara. In addition to teaching a variety of courses, he continued his research in Jesuit history in the U.S. and published numerous articles and book reviews in scholarly journals and contributed to scholarly reference works. His award winning book, Brokers of Culture: Italian Jesuits in the American West, 1848-1919, was published by Stanford University Press in 2007.

His other academic experiences included visiting professorships at Fordham University and Seattle University, memberships on the editorial board of Studies in Jesuit Spirituality, and board membership on the National Seminar on Jesuit Higher Education. He also served on the Board of Trustees of Santa Clara and Gonzaga Universities and was active in professional organizations. He curated an extensive collection of Jesuits in fiction, now part of the university’s special collections, and cultivated his hobby of watercolor painting.

After his retirement from the classroom, he continued his research and gave a number of lectures to a wide variety of audiences. At the time of his death he was working on a book length history of Jesuit higher education in the United States.

Contributions in Jerry’s memory may be made to the Ignatian Center for Jesuit Education, Santa Clara University, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara, CA 95053.

submitted Sep. 22, 2015 9:09A

1950

'50
Timothy Murphy

Timothy P. Murphy '50, MS '76 Nov. 12, 2015. Born with his sister Patricia at O’Connor Hospital on Dec. 2, 1925. A World War II Army Veteran he spent 50 years in the electronics industry. He is survived by his wife Margaret, six children, eight grandchildren, two great-grandchildren.

 

submitted Dec. 2, 2015 9:17A
'50
Robert Finocchio Sr.

Robert Finocchio Sr. '50, born Dec. 3, 1928 and a resident of Los Gatos, passed away on August 31 at the age of 86 with his loving wife and children by his side. Born and raised in San Francisco, Bob attended St. Ignatius High School and in 1950, graduated from Santa Clara University. In the summer following graduation, Bob married Virginia Arata of Ross, California, with whom he celebrated a 65th wedding anniversary on August 19th of this year. Bob had a long and successful career with the Bank of America where he started as a teller and nearly 40 years later, retired as a senior executive. Bob's work at the bank served to finance the transition of the Santa Clara Valley from an agricultural economy to the Silicon Valley we know today. Bob was also a dedicated alumnus of Santa Clara University, serving as a member of the Board of Fellows for many years. He loved hunting and golf and was an avid sports fan. Most of all, Bob was a devoted husband and father who created a family life filled with fun, laughter, and many wonderful traditions. In addition to his wife, Virginia, Bob is survived by his seven children: Robert J. Finocchio Jr. ’73 (Susan), who has served as Chair of the Board of Trustees and Dean’s Executive Professor of Management at SCU; Suzanne Rollin, Marianne Jackson, Judy Schebetta, Alan Finocchio, Chris Finocchio (Tiffany), and Melissa Burdekin (John), his seventeen grandchildren, Alex, Amanda, Bryce, Chris, Erik, David, Garth, Gray, Joseph, Jonathan, Kyle, Matthew, Madeleine, Nathaniel, Nick, Peter, Ryan, and his five great grandchildren, Brendan, Everett, Jasmine, Max, and Parker. A funeral Mass was held on Sept. 11 at the Mission Church. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made to the Scholarship Fund at Santa Clara University. 

submitted Sep. 11, 2015 8:38A
UGRD Leavey Business '50
Richard DiNapoli

Richard DiNapoli '50, resident of Los Gatos, passed away peacefully at his Los Gatos home on Aug. 22, 2015, surrounded by his wife Lynette of 61 years, and his immediate family. He was 88 years old.

Dick was born in San Jose, CA to Frank and Edna DiNapoli. He was the eldest brother to Shirlee DiNapoli Schiro and J. "Phil" DiNapoli J.D. '64. Dick was a graduate of Bellarmine High School and Santa Clara University and served in World War II as a Merchant Marine.

Dick was blessed with a long and successful career managing Sun Garden Packing Company. For 55 years, Sun Garden canned peaches, apricots and tomatoes in San Jose employing thousands of loyal and hardworking Santa Clara residents. Dick had a genuine interest in people and treated everyone he met with kindness and respect. When Sun Garden closed in 1994, it was the last remaining tomato processor in "The Valley of Heart's Delight".

Along with his wife and siblings, Dick is survived by his three sons and daughters-in-law, Richard "Rick" '77 and Julie, Rob and Karin, Matt and Gretchen, seven grandchildren Gina, Emerson, Elizabeth, Aaron, Madison, Christopher, Justin and two great grandchildren, Bowyn and Rocco; most of whom joined Dick and Lynette each and every Sunday for dinner.

Dick will be remembered for his patience, loyalty and gentile demeanor. He had a zest for life and a desire not to miss out on anything, especially if it involved family. He exited this world exactly how he lived it, with grace and dignity.

submitted Sep. 4, 2015 9:32A
'50
George A Stein

George A. Stein '50 passed away peacefully at his Napa home on Sept. 11, 2015.

George was born on Jan. 6, 1929 in St. Louis, Missouri to Melvin and Hattie Stein. The family moved to Napa in 1938. He graduated from Napa High in 1946 and received a full basketball scholarship to the University of Santa Clara, where he graduated with a BS degree in commerce. George served in the Army for two years at the time of the Korean War. Following his time in the service, he began his minor league baseball career with the Yankees farm club. During this time he met and married Shirley Russell. They moved to Napa in 1954 and George started working at Basalt Rock Company and became involved in the Napa community, serving on the Civil Service Commission and the Grand Jury. When Basalt was later purchased by Dillingham Corporation he was appointed Vice President of Labor Relations and continued to be greatly respected and known as a man of his word. George retired from Dillingham in 1994 and immediately started his new career as Administrator of the California Field Iron Workers Administrative Trust. He retired on December 31, 2013 just a few days shy of his 85th birthday. George was very proud of the fact that he never missed a paycheck in 59 years of work.

In 1985 George married Carol Hamon Jones and they just celebrated their 30th wedding anniversary. They enjoyed traveling and reached their goal of visiting the capitols of all 50 states. Additionally, they found time to travel to all 58 county seats in California.

George loved all sports and was an avid bowler and golfer. He was always grateful for what his sports career at Napa High had done for his life. It gave him the opportunity to attend the University of Santa Clara on a basketball scholarship. Because he wanted to acknowledge the important part the NHS Athletic Department had in his life and the lives of many other students, he led the effort to create the Napa High Athletic Hall of Fame Foundation. He thought it was a fitting way to celebrate the 1997 Napa High School 100 year anniversary. George’s older brother Mel was inducted in its inaugural year and George followed in 2000.

George is survived by his wife Carol; his children Linda Fitzgerald of San Luis Obispo, James (Dianna) of Lodi and Susan of Napa; his stepdaughter Amanda Jones of Napa; and his multiple grandchildren.

He was predeceased by his parents, brother Mel and his stepdaughter Karen Jones Shubin.

submitted Dec. 19, 2015 12:39P

1952

UGRD Engineering '52
Joseph Vincent Reynolds Jr.

Joseph Vincent Reynolds Jr. '52 passed away on July 10th at his home in Napa. He was born on May 18th, 1928 in Los Angeles, CA to parents Joseph Vincent Reynolds Sr. and Helena Ingaborg Strom. He had one sibling, Patricia Reynolds, born in 1930. He graduated from Loyola High School in Los Angeles. After graduation he joined the Army and served a one year tour of duty with the 69th Division of engineers in Korea. Upon returning home he enrolled at the University of Santa Clara on the GI bill and obtained a B.S. in engineering in 1952. During his senior year in 1951 he met his future wife, Carol (Hinds) Reynolds, when mutual friends introduced them on a blind date. Following graduation Joe was called back into the Army and served a second one year tour in Korea, this time with the 235th Field Engineers. Following his discharge from the Army, Joe and Carol were married in Los Angeles in April of 1954. Joe?s career in civil engineering began in Los Angeles, then Burbank, then Santa Paula, and in 1960 the family moved to Walnut Creek when he began working for the Bechtel Corporation. In 1966 he was hired by the Public Works Department of Napa and the family moved to Napa in 1967. In 1968 Joe moved to the Napa County Flood Control District office and later became Chief Flood Control Engineer. In 1976 Joe returned to work for Bechtel and spent time in Saudi Arabia working on the engineering and implementation of the water systems for the city of Jubail. He retired in 1994. Joe was a loving and beloved family man, and most enjoyed time spent with his family and working around his property in Napa. He was a gracious and genial host to extended family and friends as he and Carol hosted many parties and family reunions over the years. Joe also enjoyed spending time in nature, having developed a love of backpacking early in his marriage. He took several trips with his children to the Trinity National Forest in northern California. Even into his early 70s, he went on solo backpacking trips. An avid reader, he shared that love by reading out loud to his children. He and youngest daughter Amy would read to each other in later years. Joe is survived by his wife of 61 years, Carol Reynolds, children Teresa Reynolds, Mary Jane Reynolds, Shannon Victor '85, Ann Reynolds, Amy Reynolds and daughter in law Vanessa Waddy. He was preceded in death by children Kathleen Crews, Christopher Reynolds and Timothy Reynolds. His grandchildren are Andrew Crews, Bethany Crews, Emily Crews, Brian Crews, Langston Waddy-Reynolds, Moira Waddy-Reynolds, Neemah Waddy-Reynolds, Helena Victor and Liam Reynolds.

submitted Aug. 13, 2015 11:19A

1953

UGRD Leavey Business '53
Thomas F. Joyce
Tom Joyce '53 departed from us peacefully on April 6, 2015, surrounded by his loving wife and children. One of nine siblings, Tom was born to Raymond Eugene and SaBina (Knox) Joyce, in Miller, South Dakota, and was raised in the farming community of Sykeston, North Dakota. 
 
Tom is survived by his devoted wife, Elaine; sons John, Thomas ("Tif") Francis Jr. (Judy), and George; daughters Maureen Barber M.A. '84 (Clark), Sheila (Bill) Kellerman, Teresa (Rick) Kooi, and Veronica Joyce Gallart; and eleven grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his infant twin sons, Patrick and Michael, and four siblings.
 
Tom skipped two grades and graduated from high school at the age of 16, whereupon he joined the Depression-era Civilian Conservation Corps. He was especially proud of being a member of the demolition crew that helped sculpt the Mount Rushmore Presidential Monument. He then entered naval flight training, earning his wings in 1944 at the age of 21. During World War II he served as a pilot of Hellcats and Corsair F4Us on aircraft carriers, and participated in both the North Atlantic and Pacific theaters. 
 
It was during the war that he met the love of his life, Elaine Nancy Harding, who was serving as a lieutenant in the Army Nurse Corps. They married in 1946 (and celebrated their 68th wedding anniversary last August!). After the war Tom attended Santa Clara University on the GI Bill, earning a degree in business in 1953. He embarked on a sales and managerial career in the data processing and computer fields, working for NCR, IBM, Raychem, the county governments of Alameda and San Mateo, and Driscoll Strawberry Associates. He was active in and held many leadership positions in civic, sports, and church organizations. 
 
Throughout the years and various relocations, Tom and Elaine raised their seven children in the communities of San Lorenzo, Redwood City, and Aptos, making lifelong friends along the way. Following retirement and two years of extensive travel, Tom and Elaine enjoyed resettling in Sonoma County. Tom was proud of his Irish heritage, and a devout Catholic. In recent years he had been a member of St. Teresa of Avila parish in Bodega. Tom believed in actively living out his faith in his daily life.
 
An avid sports fan and outstanding athlete, Tom was especially proud of his naval boxing career as a Golden Glove contender—and of having made two holes in one at Northwood Golf Course. And it was always a delight to witness Tom and Elaine taking a turn on the dance floor. An enthusiastic home renovator, he could also repair just about anything. He was even the master "architect" of elaborate practical jokes that are the stuff of legend, and that still leave people bent over in laughter when recounted. Sunday brunch won't be the same without his signature culinary specialty of the "North Dakota Breakfast," and remembering his unique linguistic wit will always elicit a laugh and a smile.
 
Gregarious, generous, joyful, loving, faithful, and fun loving, Tom achieved in admirable fashion his aspiration to be a good husband, father, neighbor, and citizen. His was a life lived well and fully. So the next time you find yourself dining with friends and family, raise your glasses high and recite the cherished toast coined by Tom—"Here's to us, good people are scarce!"
submitted Aug. 13, 2015 2:11P

1954

UGRD Arts & Sciences '54
Jim Young
Santa Clara lost a Hall of Famer and member of the only Bronco men's basketball team to make it to the Final Four with the passing of Jim Young '54 on Aug. 28. He passed away in Quincy, Calif. at the age of 82.
 
Young led the Santa Clara Final Four team with 11.8 points per game and was a First Team All-WCC selection in 1954 as well as being named NABC All-District Second Team the same year. His 1,016 points is 32nd on the all-time Bronco list.
He was a basketball coach and California history teacher at Feather River College for many years beginning in the 1970s.
 
A former basketball coach and California history teacher at Feather River College, Young is survived by his wife, Janice A. Young, and daughter Jan M. Young, both of Quincy; stepsons Alex Small, of Minnesota, and Steve Small, of Quincy; four step-grandchildren; one step-great-grandchild; his sister Mollie Hellmann; and brother David Young.
 
submitted Sep. 11, 2015 9:51A

1958

UGRD Leavey Business '58
John Philip Taglio

John Philip Taglio '58 died on Dec. 9, 2014. A native of Modesto, California, he built a storied career in the building industry throughout the state as president of Morrison Homes, while residing in Northern California. In 1996, he was inducted into the Builder's Hall of Fame, a prestigious and honorable award for excellence and professionalism. In 1997 he and his wife, Carol, retired and shared their time between Sun Valley, Idaho, and Kauai, Hawaii. John was instrumental in building the new Koloa Missionary Church in Kauai and was recognized for his integrity and compassion for his fellow man. He is survived by his wife, Carol; sons Tory and Lane (Hilary); daughter Shae Aicher (Shawn); and four grandchildren.

submitted Nov. 9, 2015 6:35P

1963

UGRD Leavey Business '63
Martin (Marty) Ziegler

Martin "Marty" Ziegler '63 attended SCU for three and a half years. He had to leave in the middle of his senior year & finished his degree in Southern California. He loved Santa Clara & always identified with that school. He passed away on Dec. 6, 2015. He is survived by his wife, Lynda, and two sons, Erich & Christian, and four grandchildren. Marty's nephew, Travis Martin Hagedorn '99, is a surviving alumni. 

submitted Dec. 17, 2015 3:36P

1964

UGRD Leavey Business '64
Thomas D. DeGregori

Thomas David DeGregori '64, 4/26/1942 to 7/1/2015. He was born and raised in Los Banos, CA, graduate of Los Banos High, Santa Clara University, and Golden Gate University, master's in taxation. Tom was a husband, father, father-in-law, CPA, Army veteran, Little League coach, investor, wine connoisseur, master card player, avid golfer, volunteer, and more. After residing in San Jose for 33 years as a CPA for Arthur Young & Co., and Pricewaterhouse Coopers, Tom and his wife of 46 years, Beverly, retired in 2003 to Greenhorn Creek Golf Resort in Angels Camp, where he lived his dream of golfing, playing bridge, and enjoying good wines with friends and family. He was the proud dad of Timothy (Amanda) DeGregori of San Jose and "Baka" to his grandsons Michael Thomas, and Leo Anthony.

submitted Oct. 6, 2015 3:49P
'64
Robert Mulcrevy

On Aug. 12, 2015, Bob Mulcrevy '64 passed away peacefully at the age of 73. Bob was born and raised in San Francisco and was an avid basketballer throughout his youth. He graduated from Saint Cecilia School ('55), St. Ignatius College Preparatory ('59) and Santa Clara University ('64). He was preceded in death by his mother and father, Frank and Cecile Mulcrevy and sisters Marie and Frankie. Bob and Gracie owned and operated Mulcrevy's Restaurant and Tavern, in SF's Marina district, from 1975-1985. He went on to run the family business at the Millbrae Pancake House until his retirement. Bob looked forward to luncheons with good friends at favorite local establishments. He was a historian, a storyteller with quick wit and always managed to find a common San Francisco connection amongst anyone he had met. He was a proud native and a devoted fan of the SF Giants and 49ers. He is survived by his four daughters, Jane Kenneally (Eric), Erin Burke (Kenny), Laura Mulcrevy, Maureen Maguire (Thomas) and his sister Anne Holder. He is survived by his ten grandchildren: Dylan and Rory Kenneally; Ava, Celine, Joseph, Lily and Tommy Maguire; Eoin, Gracie and Shane Burke. Thank you to Elir for the love and care you have shown our Dad over the years. He will be greatly missed.

submitted Aug. 21, 2015 3:55P

1968

'68
Edward L. Niland

Ed Niland '68, J.D. '75 died on August 4, 2015. Ed's death was due to complications associated with the treatment of esophageal cancer. Ed lived in Scotts Vallley. He practiced law from his office in Los Gatos. He is survived by his wife Julia and daughters Jessica and Danielle.

submitted Aug. 17, 2015 2:11P
'68
Christine Sorensen

Christine Sorensen '68, of Camarillo, California, peacefully passed into eternal life on Wednesday morning, May 27, 2015, after a 3 1/2 year battle with breast cancer.

She was born in Oxnard, July 10, 1946, to her parents, Paul O. Sorensen and Margaret Leonard Sorensen. She and her sister Sally were raised in Santa Barbara where they attended Marymount School through the ninth grade. For grades 10 - 12 they attended the Convent of the Sacred Heart in Menlo Park, CA., graduating with the class of 1964. Christine graduated from Santa Clara University with a BA in philosophy.

Chrissy dealt with Bi-Polar disorder until 1995 when improved medication, and perhaps a miracle, allowed her to resume a normal life. She will long be remembered for her joy-filled countenance and loving spirit. She brought the love and light of Jesus Christ to all who knew her.

Chrissy is survived by her sister and brother-in-law Sally and Burr Allegaert of Warrenton, Oregon; nephew Patrick McCloskey, wife Alison, and children Madeline, Chloe, Rocky, and Summer, of Huntington Beach; and a niece Michaela McCloskey of Newport Beach. All of whom loved her dearly.

submitted Aug. 27, 2015 9:23A

1971

'71
Kirk Cowan

Beloved husband, father, grandfather and great-grandfather, Kirk D. Cowan Jr. MBA '71 passed away Tuesday, October 27, 2015, surrounded by his family.

Kirk was born at home to Kirk and Margaret (Rohrer) Cowan, in rural Leeds, ND, on April 14, 1936. He attended school in Leeds where he was very involved in school activities and was a member of the 1954 state champion Leeds Lions basketball team. After high school graduation he married his junior high school sweetheart Carol (Copeland).

Kirk loved the land and always wanted to farm. He received a mechanical engineering degree from North Dakota State University and an MBA from University of Santa Clara in California. He worked in the nuclear power industry for nearly 40 years. He worked for General Electric in San Jose, CA while living and farming walnuts in Morgan Hill, CA and worked for WPPSS at Hanford while living and farming apples, cherries and pears in Grandview, WA.

Kirk had John Deere green running through his veins and after retirement immersed himself in farming and collecting and restoring his John Deere 30 series tractors.Kirk loved spending time with his family and friends. He leaves behind Carol, his beloved wife of 61 years; son, David (Susan) of Grandview, WA; daughter, Celeste (Charlie) Fender of La Center, WA; grandchildren, Tracy (Zach) Stroud, Danelle (Nik) Lubisich, Riley Fender, Caeden Fender and great-grandchildren, Mavrick and Axle Stroud. He is also survived by one sister, Diane (Lyle) Long. He was preceded in death by his parents and one sister, Irene Nestegard.

submitted Nov. 9, 2015 2:13P

1975

GRD Law '75
Edward L. Niland
see year 1968

1985

UGRD Arts & Sciences '85
Jean Marie Adam Forti
Jean Marie Adam Forti '85 passed away peacefully on August 25, 2015, in her home surrounded by her family and pets. She filled her 52 years with love, laughter, adventure and care for others. 
Jean was born in San Mateo, CA, on May 7, 1963, to Kay and Bob Adam. At the age of 6, she and her family moved to a beautiful apricot and walnut orchard in sunny San Jose, CA. Growing up, she was very active in many community and school activities, including Girl Scouts, summer camps, backpacking, tennis, skiing, horseback riding (good old sway-backed George), volunteering, and many family trips around the country.
She was a good student in San Jose, CA, participating in a senior prank involving a helicopter and ping pong balls. Her further adventures included a trip to Guatemala, driving around the country with her cousin, and exploring Europe with a best friend.
She graduated from Santa Clara University with a B.S. in Combined Sciences. After college, she crossed the country with two friends in a VW Bug, to start a new life in Albany, NY.
Jean worked with troubled children at St. Catherine's, and then with Senior Services of Albany. She joined the Hudson Mohawk Sierra Club, only to get lost on a hike and meet her future husband, Tony.
On August 24, 1991, they married in Los Gatos, CA, surrounded by good friends and family, redwood trees, and deer (who ate the flowers).
Jean and Tony spent the next 24 years building up their house in Knox, raising 3 children, farm animals and countless gardens. Their door and their hearts were always open to anyone who came along.
Jean was a pillar in her community. She co-led Girl Scout Troop 1758, helped run the Pony Pals 4-H Club, and organized the Elementary and High School Science Fairs and many PTA after school programs. She was instrumental in the Knox Youth Council and summer camp, Knox Food Pantry, Fox Creek Farm, Meals-on-Wheels, Fox Creek Players, and many other community functions. 
Despite her illness, she stayed involved as long as possible.
Jean brought a feeling of excitement and adventure into everything, always wanted to include everyone and bring any stranger into her circle. She taught her family and friends how to get the most out of every moment. 
Jean is survived by her husband Tony, daughters Katie and Marcy, son Adam, sisters Sara (Raymond) Luhrman and Cris Adam-Nakayama, brother Scot Adam, mother Kay Adam, several cousins, a niece and two nephews.
submitted Sep. 17, 2015 1:16P

1988

'88
Michelle Mullin
Michelle Mullin '88 died after a lengthy illness on Sunday, October 18.  A resident of Sunnyvale, she was 49. Born July 3, 1966 in Sacramento, CA. Michelle graduated from St. Francis High School and Santa Clara University with a B.S. in economics.
 
The Silicon Valley became her permanent home as she worked in sales and marketing for various technology firms including HP. During the early years of her career she was able to travel the world and soak up different cultures which she thoroughly enjoyed. Besides traveling, her biggest passions in life were volleyball (especially beach volleyball), any beach itself, and anything to do with Santa Clara University. As a past president of the alumni association 1999 to 2000, she stayed involved with the University working on different events.
 
Michelle is survived by her mother, Marlene Mullin; sister, Denise Lysaght (Tom), nephew Michael Lysaght '05 (Colin) and niece Jennifer Lysaght. She was preceded in death by her father, Harold Mullin '53
submitted Nov. 9, 2015 2:05P

1989

'89
Timothy Carey McShane

Timothy Carey McShane '89 died on July 7, 2015, in Seattle. Tim was born in Lawrence, Kansas, on February 27, 1967. He grew up on Capitol Hill in Seattle where he graduated from St. Joseph School and then in 1985 from Seattle Preparatory School. Tim was a very sharp, intelligent man. He was a 1989 magna cum laude graduate of Santa Clara University with a BA in political science. In his youth some of Tim's favorite activities were team soccer, debate team, and hanging out with his buddies. As an adult Tim enjoyed golf, cooking, reading, and traveling. Tim had a career in advertising and media sales and worked for many years at KZOK radio. More than anything Tim was a family man and loved spending time with his brothers, his mom and his dad, and especially with his two daughters, Katie and Liv. He was fun loving and goofy as well as kind, caring, and gentle. Tim is survived by his mother, Mary Carey; his father Paul McShane, Jr; his brothers Paul McShane III, Patrick McShane and Daniel McShane; his daughters, Katie McShane and Liv McShane, and a large extended family.

submitted Sep. 10, 2015 2:03P

2006

'06
James Michael Millett Jr.
James Michael Millett Jr. '06, known as Michael, 39, of Burlingame, CA, died on August 12, 2015, from a fatal fall while hiking in Yosemite. He was 39.
 
Michael grew up in San Carlos and lived in the Bay Area all of his life. He graduated from Bellarmine High School and Santa Clara University and spent his career working in Silicon Valley.
 
He is preceded in death by his parents, Colleen Kelleher Millett '68 and James Michael Millett, Sr. Michael leaves behind his sisters Anne Millett (Matthew Tsugawa) and Molly Butler '92 (James Butler); his nieces Georgia, Delaney & Mairin Butler; and many wonderful  aunts, uncles, cousins, and friends, including aunt Maureen Millett '71 and uncle Joseph "Joe" Millett '63. He will be remembered for his hilarious sense of humor, his dedication to his work, his passion for life, and his love for family and friends. He will be greatly and deeply missed forever.
 
submitted Oct. 2, 2015 10:43A

2015

GRD Ed./Couns Psych./Pastoral Min. '15
Michael Harris

Michael Harris '15, son of former San Francisco 49ers CEO Peter Harris, died in a tragic boating accident near Catalina Island on Sept. 6.

Among the injured victims was Harris' girlfriend of more than two years, Kelly Wells '11, who is expected to make a full recovery. The couple lived in San Francisco and were planning to move in together. Harris' brothers, David and Richard, were encouraging him to pop the question. They said Michael was supportive and provided strength during tough times, and the two were lucky to have had him as a sibling.

"We know that he was having a very fun time with his friends, fishing and enjoying the water and being happy people," David said.

“He was a young man who was real, sincere, a great listener, always interested, warm, full of humor with the attendant laughter, who sincerely loved and prized family, who had a broad group of friends, old and new he cared for greatly, who was embarking on a career in psychology he embraced with passion helping adolescents because it mattered, and who as he matured into a man was a gift to me as his dad,” Peter Harris said in the Facebook post.

Harris had just started as a high school counselor at his alma mater Menlo School, in Atherton. The brothers said they will remember their sibling as someone who lived life to the fullest.

submitted Sep. 11, 2015 8:28A

Faculty & Staff

'ff
John Merryman

An internationally renowned expert on art and cultural property law as well as comparative law, John Henry Merryman, dedicated his life to the study and teaching of law at Stanford, influencing generations of lawyers and art historians here and around the world from the time he joined the law faculty in 1953 until his death this week at the age of 95. Before that he was faculty at Santa Clara University from 1948 to 1956.

“John Merryman was a giant in several fields — comparative law and the field he helped create, art and the law,” said M. Elizabeth Magill, the Richard E. Lang Professor of Law and dean of Stanford Law School. “He was a devoted teacher and mentor to his students. He taught his last class, “Stolen Art,” only a couple months ago, and helped launch the careers of many of our graduates who work at the intersection of the arts and the law.”

Merryman, the Nelson Bowman Sweitzer and Marie B. Sweitzer Professor of Law, Emeritus, and Affiliated Professor in the Department of Art, Emeritus, died on Aug. 3, 2015 at the age of 95 of natural causes at his home in Palo Alto, Calif. Details of a memorial service are not yet available, but one is expected to be held in the fall.

Pioneering the Study of Art Law

“In 1970 no one spoke of art law as a field for serious study or even as a subject for teaching. That art law is today recognized internationally as being essential to every country interested in protecting its cultural patrimony, by every American art museum as vital to the proper conduct of its trustees and by all artists as protecting their rights, is due in large measure to the publications and teachings of John Henry Merryman,” wrote the late art historian and Stanford Professor Albert Elsen in a 1987 Stanford Law Review tribute to Merryman, “Founding the Field of Art Law.”

Merryman introduced the idea for the new course “Law, Ethics and the Visual Arts,” in 1970 to a somewhat skeptical law faculty. Merryman taught the course in 1971, the first of its kind. Elsen collaborated and co-taught with Merryman — the two delving into questions of tax, copyright, contracts, regulation, cultural property, ethics and more — creating a syllabus for the nascent field of study and publishing the groundbreaking book Law, Ethics and the Visual Arts, now in its fourth edition.

Before that, Merryman was a comparative law scholar of international standing. “His great book on The Civil Law Tradition caused a fundamental rethinking of comparative law and subsequent scholarship — and courses based on that scholarship — were powerfully strengthened as a result,” said Thomas Ehrlich, dean of Stanford Law School from 1971 until 1976. “John’s many works relating to art and cultural property, as well as his multiple courses in that arena, were no less groundbreaking. He deployed his strengths in comparative law to produce penetrating analyses on the ownership of antiquities, as well as on art and the law more generally. Students from across the Stanford campus and beyond flocked to John’s classes. John was one-of-a-kind, as colleague and as dear friend.”

Merryman was truly an international scholar who was both a Guggenheim Fellow and a Fulbright Research Professor at the Max Planck Institute. His expertise in comparative law and art law led to visiting positions at universities in Mexico, Greece, Italy, Germany and Austria. He was president of the International Cultural Property Society and on the editorial board for various publications, including theInternational Journal of Cultural Propertyand the American Journal of Comparative Law.

He received numerous international prizes and honors over the course of his career, including the Order of Merit of the Italian Republic and honorary doctorates from Aix-en-Provence, Rome (Tor Vergata), and Trieste, and was celebrated in two Festschriften: “Comparative and Private International Law: Essays in Honor of John Henry Merryman on His Seventieth Birthday” and “Legal Culture in the Age of Globalization: Latin America and Latin Europe.”

In 2004 he received the American Society of Comparative Law’s Lifetime Achievement Award “for his extraordinary scholarly contribution over a lifetime to comparative law in the United States.”

“John was for all of us a model of civility and old-world charm. He bore with unfailing grace the mounting burdens of age, continuing to write and teach deep into his retirement,” said George Fisher, the Judge John Crown Professor of Law and faculty co-director of the Stanford Criminal Prosecution Clinic. “And he never lost his generous interest in the work of his friends and colleagues. He was a scholar for the ages.”

“He was a truly innovative scholar, ahead of his time throughout his long career,” said Lawrence M. Friedman, the Marion Rice Kirkwood Professor of Law.

Merryman’s expertise in and enthusiasm for art benefited Stanford beyond the reach of his scholarship. In the 1970s, when the law school was building its “new” campus, he chaired the design committee.

“When the law school moved from the Quad to its new home in 1975, John undertook to use his art expertise to persuade some of the best graphic printmakers to lend major works of art to the Law School where they became the best art collection at Stanford apart from the Museum,” recalled Ehrlich. “He identified a stunning Barbara Hepworth sculpture [titled “Four Square (Walk Through)”] to borrow as the centerpiece of the school’s courtyard, and when the loan was up he arranged a gift of the elegant Calder sculpture that replaced it (titled “Le Faucon”). In honor of his many contributions to art, a good friend and admirer gave Stanford one of the largest and most handsome sculptures on the campus, created by Mark di Suvero.”

The di Suvero sculpture, “The Sieve of Eratosthenes,” was, according to a Stanford press release from March 2000, donated to Stanford by Daniel Shapiro and Agnes Gund, who wished to honor Merryman “by thanking him for all he has done for us and everyone interested in art by giving a gift in his honor to Stanford of a work of an artist that John thought was sorely missing on campus. And so now, because of John, there is Mark di Suvero’s ‘The Sieve of Eratosthenes,’ the work of a great artist to celebrate a great teacher and friend of art.”

Early Enthusiasm for Music and the Arts

Born in Portland, Ore., on Feb. 24, 1920, Merryman studied chemistry at the University of Portland and received a B.S. in chemistry in 1943. He continued his study of chemistry, receiving an M.S. from the University of Notre Dame in 1944, but then switched to law. He received a J.D. from the University of Notre Dame in 1947. NYU School of Law provided him with a teaching fellowship and the opportunity to continue his legal studies and he received his LLM in 1950 and JSD in 1955. He taught law at Santa Clara University (then called the University of Santa Clara) and joined the Stanford Law faculty in 1953.

Merryman also was a professional, card-carrying musician, financing his early education by playing piano in a dance band he formed called John Merryman and His Merry Men. He continued to play piano throughout his life, sharing his enthusiasm for music and the arts at Stanford.

“John and his wonderful late wife, Nancy, were friends of my wife Ellen and me for over 50 years, since we first came to Stanford in 1965, as they were friends of countless others — literally from around the world,” recalled Ehrlich. “John had a joyful spirit that illuminated not just every conversation of which he was a part, but every room where he was present. He was a wonderful piano player of Broadway show hits, jazz and much more. John was a learner, and he was able to share his learning with his friends with such a twinkle in his eye that you quite forgot that he was really teaching you and helping along while telling riotously funny tales.”

That early enthusiasm barely dimmed in retirement, as he continued to publish — and to teach. “Stolen Art,” which he taught in fall 2014, was a new course he had recently developed, likely the first of its kind.

“Some years ago I had the pleasure of ‘taking’ John’s oral history. I was struck by the satisfying life revealed in his reminiscences, full of intellectual challenge and warm communal interchange,” said Barbara Allen Babcock, the Judge John Crown Professor of Law, Emerita. “He was an inspiration.”

While his scholarship was international, it was perhaps most keenly felt at Stanford.

“In my 30 years as a faculty member at this remarkable place, John Merryman was clearly one of the most remarkable of my colleagues,” recalled Henry “Hank” T. Greely, the Deane F. and Kate Edelman Johnson Professor of Law. “Hired here as the law librarian, he managed not one but two spectacular scholarly careers, the first as one of the leading comparative law scholars in the world and then later as one of the world’s very top ‘art and the law’ scholars. His civil law work led to him being named an Italian knight — un Cavaliero della Republica Italiana. Which brings to mind an even more important point about John. He was always a gentlemen: gracious, helpful, self-deprecating. I would say that they aren’t making them like John Merryman anymore, but they (almost) never did. He was a great scholar, a wonderful colleague and a very good person. I miss him.”

“John was a treasured colleague. We all sought his advice on a range of subjects because of his incisive mind, his wit and his insight. The world is a less interesting and elegant place without John,” said Magill. “We all mourn the passing of this wonderful man, who was a class act in every respect.”

Merryman is survived by three step-children, Leonard P. Edwards, Samuel D. Edwards and Bruce H. Edwards; four step-grandchildren; and five great step-grandchildren. His wife, Nancy Edwards Merryman, passed away in January. 

 

submitted Aug. 11, 2015 9:40A
'ff
David Palmer
On September 18, David R. Palmer, retired faculty member from the Management Department, died after a chronic illness. He was a treasured member of the SCU faculty for more than 30 years.  With his family and friends, we remember David and offer our prayers for his eternal rest and the consolation of all his loved ones.

David taught courses in both the undergraduate and MBA programs in the Leavey School of Business, specializing in management strategy and corporate social responsibility.  He also was instrumental in developing the Leavey School’s theme-based Executive MBA program in which he taught for many years.  David had a special love for Santa Clara University and a warm fondness for those with whom he worked for so many years.

While we mourn David’s death we also recall the gift he was to his family, friends, colleagues and students. Notes of condolence may be sent to his companion of many years, Marcie Radius, care of the Management Department:
Ms. Marcie Radius
c/o Management Department
Leavey School of Business
Santa Clara University
500 El Camino Real
Santa Clara, CA 95053
 

 

submitted Nov. 9, 2015 12:07P

Friends of the University

'ty
Lynn Hatch

Lynn Hatch, the loving, socially gifted and ever-resilient matriarch of the Hatch family, passed away peacefully in her home on September 11, 2015. She is survived by her children Katherine '81, Maury (Kristen) and Bruce and her grandchildren Nathan and Lindsay. She was preceded in death by her husband, Judge Leighton Hatch '50, and her son Francis Hatch.

Born Avalyn Hope Fjelstad in Granville, North Dakota, on December 27, 1930, Lynn was raised in North Dakota until her freshman year in high school. She then lived briefly in Chicago before traveling by train to San Francisco after World War II to join her family in Richmond, Calif. After graduating high school in 1948, she worked as a secretary in Berkeley and Oakland. In 1958 she met and married the love of her life, Leighton, and they spent 53 years building a life together full of family, community service and adventurous travel. Lynn and Leighton first lived in San Francisco, until 1960, then purchased their first home together in Mill Valley, where they started a family. In 1967 the family of six moved to Sacramento, where Governor Ronald Reagan appointed Leighton as Director of the Department of Consumer Affairs.

Over the years Lynn was an active member of the Land Park community, participating as a volunteer in the Holy Spirit Mothers' Club, the Sacramento Judges' Wives Association, and serving as a board member of the Sacramento Food Bank and Family Services Volunteer Bridge Builders Program. She volunteered as a docent for school programs, coordinated fundraising events, organized other volunteers, and provided direct service to those in need as mentored by Father Dan Madigan and Sister Kathleen Horgan. Among all these responsibilities, Lynn always felt her most significant accomplishment was raising her four children.

Lynn thoroughly enjoyed traveling and meeting people. She and Leighton, a retired Army officer, visited 33 different countries and 31 states. Her favorite trips were military "space available" travel adventures, where she often brought home-baked goods for her flight crew. Highlights of these journeys include an elephant ride in Chiang Mai, Thailand, and renewing her vows with Leighton in Cork, Ireland.

In her later years, Lynn enjoyed the company of her family and in particular her grandchildren. She found great happiness in the comfort of her puppies, Libby and Marlee. She was an avid Kindle reader, a staunch Giants fan (Sergio Romo!) and an enthusiastic armchair Jeopardy participant. During her final years, she deeply appreciated the care provided by her doctors Jeffery H. Jones and Monice Kwok, caregivers Aggie Shriwastow and Manjula Narayan, and her longtime hairdresser Kathy Garcia.

submitted Oct. 2, 2015 10:29A
'ty
Grace Sautter

Known as a selfless doer, Grace Sautter went soaring with the angels from her Los Gatos home on August 14, 2015. She was born in 1921 in the family home on 13th Street in San Jose and moved to town in 1964.

Locally, Grace was well known for her volunteer work at the Village House, a now-closed restaurant that was run by volunteers who donated their profits to Eastfield Ming Quong.

"Grace was our dishwasher," Village House volunteer Shirley Johnson said. Johnson met Grace at the restaurant 42 years ago, and the women became fast friends. "She had a beautiful soul," Johnson said. "Everybody liked her and she loved people."

Grace loved her groups, too, including the Art Docents of Los Gatos, which she joined in 1971. She served on the docents' board and was a past president.

"Grace was one of those ladies who was busy all the time," Johnson said. "She still went to meetings even when she wasn't feeling well. When she couldn't drive anymore, people picked her up."

Her list of meetings to attend included Santa Clara University's Catala Club. Grace joined the women's club in 1980 and acted as its historian. The group raises scholarship funds for SCU undergraduates.

"Grace has kept meticulous records of Catala Club events--taking pictures, putting the scrapbooks together and when possible sending copies of her photos to subjects," Catala president Dianne Bonino wrote in November 2014. "Over the years Grace has been a loyal member."

Grace was also a working woman, who was employed by the Roos Bros. and Hale Brothers department stores in the 1930s.

In 1942 she joined the Anglo Bank that later became Wells Fargo. That job led her to become the first female president of the Santa Clara County chapter of the American Institute of Banking.

Armed with a commercial banking certificate from San Jose State, Grace remained in banking until 1963. But at the age of 65, following the 1986 death of her husband Fred, Grace returned to work at Wells Fargo in Los Gatos. By the time she retired in 2003, her banking career had spanned 61 years.

"Her greatest desire in life was to be a mother," son Bill Sautter '84 wrote. An only child, Sautter described Grace as an "extraordinary mother, wife and homemaker," who was also a woman of deep Christian faith. "What mattered most to her was love and harmony with family and friends," he wrote in her obituary.

Sautter also said his mother had a near-photographic memory and was an avid traveler and photographer, a 49er and Giants fan, and a constant letter writer who had beautiful penmanship.

It's a wonder she had time to be the caregiver for her older sister Elsie Sullivan, who is now 101 years old.

submitted Aug. 21, 2015 1:34P
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