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Class Notes | Obituaries

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Showing obituaries submitted in the last year by graduates in the 1990s

1990

'90
Maureen Bischel

Maureen Bischel ’90 was born in Fresno, California, on March 11, 1968, and attended Ruth Gibson Elementary School, Tenaya Jr High, and San Joaquin Memorial High School, graduating with honors in 1986. Maureen went on to Santa Clara University, where she received a B.S. in biology. Next up was Fresno State, where she received a B.S. in nursing. Maureen’s first job as a nurse was at Valley Children’s Hospital in Madera, California; she also worked at Fresno’s University Medical Center in the emergency room as a trauma nurse and a mobile intensive care nurse, but her last job as a nurse was at Community Regional Medical Center in the interventional pre-procedure unit (PICA), where she made great friends. She would always say, “We are a family in PICA,” and she loved being a part of the PICA family. She is preceded in death by her father, Donald R. Bischel, grandparents Elizabeth Lyon and Henry Bischel, Grace Beathe, and Patrick Beathe. She is survived by her mother, Mabel Bischel, and her sister, Victoria Oakley. Maureen became very active in the amputee coalition and the Central Valley amputee group. She had recently attended a class to be able to be a peer visitor to new amputees. She absolutely loved being able to talk to new amputees and spend time with each and every patient in which she came into contact. Maureen’s passion was with the diabetic youth foundation and Bearskin Meadows. She attended camp at Bearskin as a child, then became a junior counselor, counselor, and ultimately camp nurse, where she made many lifelong friends during all the years she spent there. Maureen died in Fresno on June 29, 2017. She was 49 years old.

submitted Aug. 7, 2017 1:30P
'90
Ann Neuhaus

A leap year baby. Ann Marie Neuhaus ’90 was born Feb. 29, 1968, in Fort Collins, Colorado, and from age 4 grew up in Sonoma. She lived in faith with grace, devotion, and humility that was a gift for all to witness. She married the love of her life, Eric Neuhaus, in July of 1991, and they were blessed with two beautiful children, Rachel and Elijah. Ann loved her family and being a mom more than words can say. She had a passion for achieving her personal best in every aspect of her life. All who knew her admired how she lived every day with love, joy, and gratitude to God for all the gifts in her life. Ann graduated from Justin-Siena High School in 1986, where she played varsity basketball all four years and subsequently attended Santa Clara University on a full academic/basketball scholarship, graduating in 1990 with a B.S. degree in biology. She completed medical school at UCSF and began her surgical residency at UC Davis in 1994. Following her six-year residency, Ann worked as a general surgeon at Kaiser South Sacramento. She completed a one-year laparoscopic surgical fellowship in London in 2005 before returning to her surgical career at Kaiser South Sacramento. She passed away on July 5, 2017.

submitted Aug. 7, 2017 12:33P

1991

GRD Ed./Couns Psych./Pastoral Min. '91
Anne L. Broderick

Anne L. Broderick M.A. ’91 was born on Feb. 10, 1939, in Forest Hills, New York, and graduated secondary school from Convent of the Sacred Heart in Greenwich, Connecticut. She went on to complete a bachelor’s and master’s degree in economics at Arizona State University as well as a master’s degree in counseling psychology at SCU. After a successful career in administrative management in the high tech industry, Anne began a second career as a private psychotherapist and executive coach, consulting for large employers in the Bay Area. She married Bill Broderick in 1959, with whom she had three children, Peter, Lisa, and Laura. After her husband died in 1984, she married Lou Kavanau in 1987 and acquired three additional children, Marci, Corrie, and Tracy, from his previous marriage. She subsequently enjoyed the company of seven grandsons, and she readily admitted that grandparenting was way more fun than parenting. Anne died peacefully surrounded by her loving family members on July 27 2017. She wished all farewell and joined her beloved husband, Lou Kavanau, who was impatiently awaiting her return after his own journey ended in 2014. Anne bid adieu to the many people who expressed their gratitude for her friendship during a recent party in early July to affirm she was not dead yet. She will be most remembered by her friends for her indomitable spirit to persevere and her poise in the face of adversity; and her children will remember her for the enduring examples of love, integrity, nurturing, and achievement that resulted in the useful neuroses typically found in successful individuals. The family asks only that Anne be remembered during election cycles by voting for intelligent, articulate, honest politicians who represent what is best for the country.

submitted Aug. 21, 2017 12:42P

1992

'92
Kelly Knight

Kelly M. Knight ’92 was born on Nov. 23, 1970, to Donald and Jane Day in Monterey, California, and grew up in Pebble Beach. Kelly attended elementary school in Pacific Grove, middle school at Santa Catalina, and graduated from Stevenson School in Pebble Beach. She was an elementary school teacher in Ridgecrest, California, and did substitute teaching in the Carmel Clay school system in Carmel, Indiana. Kelly was her husband’s personal travel agent, and when together, they traveled all over the world. She enjoyed scrapbooking with her friends, cooking, and was a voracious reader. She was very proud that she had been a contestant on the game show, Jeopardy!, as well as being an active volunteer—and when her health would not allow her to volunteer, she was a great advocate and donor along with her husband, Matt. Kelly passed away on Oct. 31, 2014, from complications of cystic fibrosis. In addition to her parents, she is survived by her loving husband, Matt Knight; siblings, Danny Day (Yolanda), Julie Day Rotter, Jimmy Day (Ginny), and Conny Roeder (Stefan); nieces Lisa Day, Michelle Scharton, Lindsay Day, Stephanie Rotter Kamper, Becca Rotter, Tiffany Day Marotta, Victoria Day and Franziska Roeder; as well as two great nephews and four great-nieces. 

submitted Aug. 7, 2017 12:41P

1996

GRD Jesuit School of Theology '96
Virginia Falk

Virginia Falk M.A. ’96 entered the Franciscan Missionaries of Mary (FMM) on Sept. 18, 1951, at North Providence. She pronounced her first vows March 19, 1954, and her final vows on March 19, 1957. Virginia served as a teacher for over 30 years in the United States, India, and Africa. She served as a chaplain and music practitioner in various churches and facilities, realizing her lifelong dream of ministry to the sick and dying—and to serve through the use of music. Virginia continued her music ministry at LaGrange, Georgia. She led a small group from the Catholic parish, which used music and sound for healing. She introduced liturgical music and cantering, training others for this ministry. Born an identical twin in Monroe, Louisiana, Virginia lost both parents before the age of ten. Grandparents in New Orleans raised her and her twin. At an early age she felt a strong attraction to St. Francis, to Africa, and to missionary life. She discovered the FMMs at the age of 12 and began a five-year correspondence, after which she entered the Fruit Hill Novitiate in 1951. After first profession, Virginia was sent to study at Emmanuel College in Boston, earning a B.A. in English. She was assigned to Fall River, and at Espirito Santo School a teaching ministry, which lasted 30 years. Although her dream of Africa was stronger than ever, she spent another six years in America—in Massachusetts, Cincinnati, and St. Louis, including graduate studies at Boston College in English. In 1964 Virginia sailed at last to the foreign missions via Rome. She was missioned not to Africa, the land of her dreams, but to India, where she spent seven and a half years teaching all levels in the schools and college, until ill health forced her to return to the U.S. After a year of recuperation, she was assigned to the province of Ghana/Liberia, where she spent the next decade, teaching and setting up a seminary library. During those years, Virginia had the opportunity to do a ten-month renewal course at AMECEA Pastoral Institute in Kenya. Virginia was missioned to the U.S. in 1983 and was assigned to the Navajo Reservation for the next five years, teaching in a public high school and coordinating music in the parish. In 1988, at the onset of burnout, she knew she had to leave the teaching ministry, which she had loved. This was a great turning point. It was time to realize a double-faceted dream that had been born in early childhood years; to work with the sick and the dying and to serve through the use of music. Virginia became certified as a chaplain and worked in AIDS ministry until she began studies at SCU for a M.A. in liturgical music. In 1996 she was assigned to Florida. Virginia became a hospital chaplain and was able to fulfill requirements for a certification as music practitioner from the Music for Healing and Transition Program. She started a Southeastern area for the program and served as area coordinator for two years, facilitating the training and certifying music practitioners from Florida. Virginia later started a guild for music practitioners and others working with music or sound for healing. The training program and the guild continue to expand and fulfill a genuine need in Florida. Virginia served at Maria Manor, a long-term care facility, as chaplain and music practitioner. To their Care of the Dying Program she added the dimension of healing music at the bedside, singing chants and playing soft free rhythm music to aid those at the final days or hours of their lives in the task of unbinding with all they have loved and letting go of earthly life. Virginia believed that this was the work for which she was created, and that all the studies and experiences of her last 60 years as an FMM had been stepping-stones to this ministry. Virginia continued her music ministry at LaGrange. She led a small group from the Catholic parish and used music and sound for healing. She introduced liturgical music and cantering, training others for this ministry. She courageously accepted her terminal illness and went peacefully home to God on Sept. 21, 2013.

submitted Aug. 15, 2017 12:16P

1997

'97
Keith Richard Schieron

Keith Richard Schieron ’97 passed away Dec. 31, 2016, from a glioblastoma brain tumor. A lifelong music enthusiast, he joined several punk rock bands at SCU and adopted the moniker “Reverend Keith” while working as a DJ and general manager for KSCU. During this time, Keith met his wife, Sarah, whom he married in 2000. They traveled the world, living in London, Boston, and Seattle before settling on Vashon Island, Washington with their two fearless boys, Cooper and Woodrow. Embodying the core philosophy of punk, before his death Keith created the documentary We Jam Econo, dedicated to seminal punk band The Minutemen. He is survived by his wife, sons, mother and father, and brother, Mark.

submitted May. 23, 2017 12:45P

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